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Monitoring of bird abundance and distribution at McKinley Bay and Hutchison Bay, Northwest Territories, 1981 to 1993

Technical Report:

Abstract

McKinley Bay has been identified as a preferred site for a harbor to support oil and gas production in the Beaufort Sea. As the bay is a molting area for several species of diving duck, a study was initiated to monitor the effect of harbor development on birds using the bay. Baseline information on the natural annual fluctuations in the number of birds were collected for nine years at McKinley Bay and eight years at neighboring Hutchinson Bay, an area chosen as the control. The final report of the predevelopment phase of the monitoring study is presented, including results of the 1993 surveys and a summary of results of all years of surveys. There were significantly more diving ducks in McKinley Bay in early August 1990 to 1993, on average, than from 1981 to 1985. No statistically significant change in total diving ducks was noted at Hutchinson Bay. Numbers of species of divers varied substantially between years at the two bays but not to the same degree. Significantly more Pacific loons, red-throated loons, and northern pintails were recorded in the 1990-1993 surveys at McKinley Bay than in earlier surveys. Potential explanations for the large between-year fluctuations in diving duck numbers  More>>
Publication Date:
Apr 01, 1994
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
CWS/PNR-69-5/204E; MICROLOG-95-01062
Reference Number:
SCA: 540000; PA: CANM-95:0E2847; EDB-95:059274; SN: 95001364478
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1994; Related Information: Technical report series, No. 204
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; NORTHWEST TERRITORIES; DUCKS; AERIAL SURVEYING; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; HARBORS; POPULATION DYNAMICS; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION
OSTI ID:
25515
Research Organizations:
Canadian Wildlife Service, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Prairie and Northern Region
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0831-6481; TRN: CA95E2847
Availability:
MF PRICES UPON REQUEST
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
60 p.
Announcement Date:
Apr 14, 1995

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Cornish, B J, and Dickson, D L. Monitoring of bird abundance and distribution at McKinley Bay and Hutchison Bay, Northwest Territories, 1981 to 1993. Canada: N. p., 1994. Web.
Cornish, B J, & Dickson, D L. Monitoring of bird abundance and distribution at McKinley Bay and Hutchison Bay, Northwest Territories, 1981 to 1993. Canada.
Cornish, B J, and Dickson, D L. 1994. "Monitoring of bird abundance and distribution at McKinley Bay and Hutchison Bay, Northwest Territories, 1981 to 1993." Canada.
@misc{etde_25515,
title = {Monitoring of bird abundance and distribution at McKinley Bay and Hutchison Bay, Northwest Territories, 1981 to 1993}
author = {Cornish, B J, and Dickson, D L}
abstractNote = {McKinley Bay has been identified as a preferred site for a harbor to support oil and gas production in the Beaufort Sea. As the bay is a molting area for several species of diving duck, a study was initiated to monitor the effect of harbor development on birds using the bay. Baseline information on the natural annual fluctuations in the number of birds were collected for nine years at McKinley Bay and eight years at neighboring Hutchinson Bay, an area chosen as the control. The final report of the predevelopment phase of the monitoring study is presented, including results of the 1993 surveys and a summary of results of all years of surveys. There were significantly more diving ducks in McKinley Bay in early August 1990 to 1993, on average, than from 1981 to 1985. No statistically significant change in total diving ducks was noted at Hutchinson Bay. Numbers of species of divers varied substantially between years at the two bays but not to the same degree. Significantly more Pacific loons, red-throated loons, and northern pintails were recorded in the 1990-1993 surveys at McKinley Bay than in earlier surveys. Potential explanations for the large between-year fluctuations in diving duck numbers are discussed. The variations may be due to bird responses to changes in the physical environment or related to the limitations of the aerial survey techniques used. Because of the large natural fluctuations in numbers of molting diving ducks using these bays in early August, it will be difficult to detect future impacts of industrial disturbance, even when sources of survey bias are minimized. It is concluded that aerial surveys of molting diving ducks in the two bays are unsuitable for monitoring the effects of industrial development. 41 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1994}
month = {Apr}
}