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Accelerator update

Abstract

When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-16A0225
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ANTIPROTONS; CERN LHC; CERN SPS SYNCHROTRON; FERMILAB TEVATRON; GEV RANGE 100-1000; KAONS NEUTRAL; LEAD IONS; LEP STORAGE RINGS; NEUTRINO BEAMS; SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS; SUPERCONDUCTING SUPER COLLIDER
OSTI ID:
22556074
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC16A0225127233
Availability:
Available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732439/files/vol35-issue6-p023-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 23-29
Announcement Date:
Jan 09, 2017

Citation Formats

Anon. Accelerator update. CERN: N. p., 1995. Web.
Anon. Accelerator update. CERN.
Anon. 1995. "Accelerator update." CERN.
@misc{etde_22556074,
title = {Accelerator update}
author = {Anon.}
abstractNote = {When the Accelerator Conference, combined International High Energy and US Particle versions, held in Dallas in May, was initially scheduled, progress nearby for the US Superconducting Supercollider was high on the preliminary agenda. With the SSC voted down by Congress in October 1993, this was no longer the case. However the content of the meeting, in terms of both its deep implications for ambitious new projects and the breadth of its scope, showed that the worldwide particle accelerator field is far from being moribund. A traditional feature of such accelerator conferences is the multiplicity of parallel sessions. No one person can attend all sessions, so that delegates can follow completely different paths and emerge with totally different impressions. Despite this overload, and despite the SSC cancellation, the general picture is one of encouraging progress over a wide range of major new projects throughout the world. At the same time, spinoff from, and applications of, accelerators and accelerator technology are becoming increasingly important. Centrestage is now CERN's LHC proton-proton collider, where a test string of superconducting magnets is operating over long periods at the nominal LHC field of 8.36 tesla or more. The assignment of the underground areas in the existing 27- kilometre LEP tunnel is now quasidefinitive (see page 3). For CERN's existing big machine, the LEP electron-positron collider, ongoing work concentrates on boosting performance using improved optics and bunch trains. But the main objective is the LEP2 scheme using superconducting accelerating cavities to boost the beam energy (see page 6). After some initial teething problems, production and operation of these cavities appears to have been mastered, at least under test conditions. A highlight at CERN last year was the first run with lead ions (December 1994, page 15). Handling these heavy particles with systems originally designed for protons calls for ingenuity. The SPS has managed to accelerate them making full use of the travelling wave properties of the SPS 200 MHz system. For Fermilab's Tevatron, the US flagship machine, construction is now underway for the new 150 GeV Main Injector to provide an improved feed to the superconducting ring. This will ultimately boost Fermilab's proton supply to 6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse for fixed target work and, with additional recycling and buffer rings for precious antiprotons, the protonantiproton collision luminosity could climb to 10{sup 33} per sq cm per s. As well as feeding the Tevatron, the new Main Injector will provide capabilities for neutral kaon studies and for neutrino beams.}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {6}
volume = {35}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1995}
month = {Sep}
}