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Positron emission tomography

Abstract

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body.
Authors:
Lindback, Stig [1] 
  1. GEMS PET Systems AB, Uppsala (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-16A0198
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
07 ISOTOPES AND RADIATION SOURCES; BIOCHEMISTRY; CARBON 11; DIAGNOSIS; FLUORINE 18; ISOTOPE PRODUCTION; NITROGEN 13; OXYGEN 15; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; TRACER TECHNIQUES
OSTI ID:
22556048
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC16A0198127207
Availability:
Available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732412/files/vol35-issue5-p004-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 4-6
Announcement Date:
Jan 07, 2017

Citation Formats

Lindback, Stig. Positron emission tomography. CERN: N. p., 1995. Web.
Lindback, Stig. Positron emission tomography. CERN.
Lindback, Stig. 1995. "Positron emission tomography." CERN.
@misc{etde_22556048,
title = {Positron emission tomography}
author = {Lindback, Stig}
abstractNote = {Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an advanced nuclear medicine technique used for research at major centres. Unique diagnostic information is obtained from tomographic measurements of the biochemistry and physiology of tissues and organs. In theory, diseases are related to biochemical changes and these can be observed with PET long before any anatomical changes are detectable. In PET the radioactive component is a positron-emitting isotope or 'tracer'. The positrons annihilate with electrons in the body to produce two gamma rays 180° apart; coincidence detection of these gammas provides a very efficient method of determining the spatial distribution of the radioisotope tracer. Because physiological measurements are usually required in a single imaging session, very short-lived isotopes are used to label the tracer molecules; isotope production and labelling is usually carried out in situ. The most commonly used radionuclides are carbon- 11 (half-life 20 minutes), nitrogen-13 (10 minutes), oxygen-15 (2 minutes), and fluorine-18 (110 minutes). A PET system has three major components: - a particle accelerator with targets for production of the positron-emitting isotopes; - chemistry modules for synthesis and labelling of the desired tracers; - and a PET camera for in-vivo measurements of the distribution of the tracer in the body.}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {5}
volume = {35}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1995}
month = {Jul}
}