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Caught in the Web

Abstract

The World-Wide Web may have taken the Internet by storm, but many people would be surprised to learn that it owes its existence to CERN. Around half the world's particle physicists come to CERN for their experiments, and the Web is the result of their need to share information quickly and easily on a global scale. Six years after Tim Berners-Lee's inspired idea to marry hypertext to the Internet in 1989, CERN is handing over future Web development to the World-Wide Web Consortium, run by the French National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Control, INRIA, and the Laboratory for Computer Science of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, leaving itself free to concentrate on physics. The Laboratory marked this transition with a conference designed to give a taste of what the Web can do, whilst firmly stamping it with the label ''Made in CERN''. Over 200 European journalists and educationalists came to CERN on 8 - 9 March for the World-Wide Web Days, resulting in wide media coverage. The conference was opened by UK Science Minister David Hunt who stressed the importance of fundamental research in generating new ideas. ''Who could have guessed 10 years ago'', he said,  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1995
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-16A0185
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CERN; COMPUTERS; INTERNET; MEETINGS
OSTI ID:
22556036
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC16A0185127195
Availability:
Available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732399/files/vol35-issue4-p001-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1-4
Announcement Date:
Jan 07, 2017

Citation Formats

Gillies, James. Caught in the Web. CERN: N. p., 1995. Web.
Gillies, James. Caught in the Web. CERN.
Gillies, James. 1995. "Caught in the Web." CERN.
@misc{etde_22556036,
title = {Caught in the Web}
author = {Gillies, James}
abstractNote = {The World-Wide Web may have taken the Internet by storm, but many people would be surprised to learn that it owes its existence to CERN. Around half the world's particle physicists come to CERN for their experiments, and the Web is the result of their need to share information quickly and easily on a global scale. Six years after Tim Berners-Lee's inspired idea to marry hypertext to the Internet in 1989, CERN is handing over future Web development to the World-Wide Web Consortium, run by the French National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Control, INRIA, and the Laboratory for Computer Science of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, leaving itself free to concentrate on physics. The Laboratory marked this transition with a conference designed to give a taste of what the Web can do, whilst firmly stamping it with the label ''Made in CERN''. Over 200 European journalists and educationalists came to CERN on 8 - 9 March for the World-Wide Web Days, resulting in wide media coverage. The conference was opened by UK Science Minister David Hunt who stressed the importance of fundamental research in generating new ideas. ''Who could have guessed 10 years ago'', he said, ''that particle physics research would lead to a communication system which would allow every school to have the biggest library in the world in a single computer?''. In his introduction, the Minister also pointed out that ''CERN and other basic research laboratories help to break new technological ground and sow the seeds of what will become mainstream manufacturing in the future.'' Learning the jargon is often the hardest part of coming to grips with any new invention, so CERN put it at the top of the agenda. Jacques Altaber, who helped introduce the Internet to CERN in the early 1980s, explained that without the Internet, the Web couldn't exist. The Internet began as a US Defense Department research project in the 1970s and has grown into a global network-ofnetworks linking some three million computers in over 100 countries. Its strength is that it is user-driven and evolves in a democratic and Darwinistic fashion. Good network products thrive, whilst poor ones wither. The Web, a relative newcomer, is to the Internet what mammals were to the post-Cretaceous Earth, sweeping all else before it.}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {4}
volume = {35}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1995}
month = {Jun}
}