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Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada

Conference:

Abstract

Any major project development, including those related to nuclear activities in Canada, will certainly impose a wide range of effects and consequences for a host community and region. These wide ranging effects can be positive as well as negative and last for varying time periods. However, the challenge is not to simply identify effects of a project and then mitigate and/or compensate for them. Rather, we have witnessed a transition in recent years that gaining community social acceptance for projects has taken on new meaning. Specifically, communities have taken a 'longer view' of themselves and are more interested in how the project will enhance their long-term well-being. There is considerable evidence to suggest that assessing and demonstrating effects on community well-being has become the focal point for community understanding and decision-making about how to proceed with any new development. This paper will examine what the term 'community well-being' is and how it applies to gaining social acceptance for major nuclear projects in Canada. Insights and examples will be gathered from a range of cases in Canada and elsewhere to demonstrate its diverse meaning and application. A discussion of its application to gaining social acceptance for nuclear projects will be generic  More>>
Authors:
Stemeroff, M.; Richardson, D.; Wlodarczyk, T. L. [1] 
  1. AECOM Canada Limited, Markham, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2011
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste management, decommissioning and environmental restoration for Canada's nuclear activities, Toronto, Ontario (Canada), 11-15 Sep 2011; Other Information: 2 figs.; Related Information: In: Waste management, decommissioning and environmental restoration for Canada's nuclear activities. Proceedings| 158 Megabytes
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; CANADA; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; PUBLIC INFORMATION; PUBLIC RELATIONS
OSTI ID:
22535593
Research Organizations:
Canadian Nuclear Society, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-1-926773-06-3; TRN: CA1600828106572
Availability:
Available from the Canadian Nuclear Society, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)
Submitting Site:
CANN
Size:
[13 page(s)]
Announcement Date:
Dec 02, 2016

Conference:

Citation Formats

Stemeroff, M., Richardson, D., and Wlodarczyk, T. L. Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada. Canada: N. p., 2011. Web.
Stemeroff, M., Richardson, D., & Wlodarczyk, T. L. Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada. Canada.
Stemeroff, M., Richardson, D., and Wlodarczyk, T. L. 2011. "Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada." Canada.
@misc{etde_22535593,
title = {Addressing host community issues through enhancing community well-being: a practical framework for siting major nuclear projects in Canada}
author = {Stemeroff, M., Richardson, D., and Wlodarczyk, T. L.}
abstractNote = {Any major project development, including those related to nuclear activities in Canada, will certainly impose a wide range of effects and consequences for a host community and region. These wide ranging effects can be positive as well as negative and last for varying time periods. However, the challenge is not to simply identify effects of a project and then mitigate and/or compensate for them. Rather, we have witnessed a transition in recent years that gaining community social acceptance for projects has taken on new meaning. Specifically, communities have taken a 'longer view' of themselves and are more interested in how the project will enhance their long-term well-being. There is considerable evidence to suggest that assessing and demonstrating effects on community well-being has become the focal point for community understanding and decision-making about how to proceed with any new development. This paper will examine what the term 'community well-being' is and how it applies to gaining social acceptance for major nuclear projects in Canada. Insights and examples will be gathered from a range of cases in Canada and elsewhere to demonstrate its diverse meaning and application. A discussion of its application to gaining social acceptance for nuclear projects will be generic in nature and provide a useful framework that can be adapted to the meet the needs in unique situations. There is extensive literature with a cornucopia of subject headers including: community well-being, sustainable development, sustainability, social capital, social well-being, participatory development, and so on. In many cases, these and other terms are used interchangeably or applied as a sub-set to another term. There is no distinct rule or collective wisdom regarding which term to use under different circumstances or situations. Suffice it to say that the notion of community well-being, sustainable development and the like are not new terms or concepts, even in Canada. Despite the wide use of different terminology, all relate to a similar set of goals, largely being the improvement of community and/or individual quality-of-life or state of well-being over the long-term. There is an old adage that says 'you get what you measure'. In this case, simply defining community well-being, no matter the nature or scope of it, is not enough to make it happen. For many, the process of measuring community well-being provides a concrete focus to engage local citizens and to strengthen communities through discussions about what matters most to them. The process of defining community well-being and developing community well-being indicators and community plans is seen by many as an excellent way to inform and involve local people and organizations, and it is a meaningful undertaking for local citizens. It enables them to identify their key issues, discuss their priorities and contribute to possible actions and plans for their community that they feel they have developed for themselves. Involving citizens in the process is more likely to lead to change (hopefully increase) in community well-being. It will be shown that local community stakeholders 'buy-in' to or adopt changes more readily when they are a part of the 'well-being assessment' process from the beginning and are involved in assessing how it directly applies to them. What this means for the nuclear industry in siting and implementing its projects and activities, (from uranium mining, milling and processing, power generation and transmission, to decommissioning and waste management), will be discussed. The end game is earning social acceptance by leveraging publically accessible and open communication medium (which we refer to as 'Open Source' approaches,), such as Facebook, Twitter, etc. In some sense this is the new reality of project approvals -- which we refer to later as Project Approvals 2.0. Using a community well-being framework is a tactic that when applied in right measure and context, can be most effective in demonstrating your commitment to an outcomes based approach for the community that can withstand the test of time. The paper will conclude with direct and meaningful ideas of how to effectively implement such a framework to engage Aboriginal and non-aboriginal communities and other affected stakeholders in social acceptance process for your projects. (author)}
place = {Canada}
year = {2011}
month = {Jul}
}