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Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation

Abstract

We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1 min and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)
Authors:
Connor, Christopher W; Saffary, Roya; Feliz, Eddy [1] 
  1. Department of Anesthesiology Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Dec 15, 2013
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physiological Measurement (Print); Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 12; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANESTHESIA; CARTILAGE; HAZARDS; IN VIVO; PERFORMANCE; RESISTORS; SIMULATION; STOMACH; TESTING; THIN FILMS
OSTI ID:
22480234
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0967-3334; TRN: GB15I6599050128
Availability:
Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0967-3334/34/12/1645
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1645-1656
Announcement Date:
May 18, 2016

Citation Formats

Connor, Christopher W, Saffary, Roya, and Feliz, Eddy. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation. United Kingdom: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1088/0967-3334/34/12/1645.
Connor, Christopher W, Saffary, Roya, & Feliz, Eddy. Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation. United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/0967-3334/34/12/1645.
Connor, Christopher W, Saffary, Roya, and Feliz, Eddy. 2013. "Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation." United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/0967-3334/34/12/1645. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1088/0967-3334/34/12/1645.
@misc{etde_22480234,
title = {Performance of the Sellick maneuver significantly improves when residents and trained nurses use a visually interactive guidance device in simulation}
author = {Connor, Christopher W, Saffary, Roya, and Feliz, Eddy}
abstractNote = {We examined the proper performance of the Sellick maneuver, a maneuver used to reduce the risk of aspiration of stomach contents during induction of general anesthesia, using a novel device that measures and visualizes the force applied to the cricoid cartilage using thin-film force sensitive resistors in a form suitable for in vivo use. Performance was tested in three stages with twenty anaesthesiology residents and twenty trained operating room nurses. Firstly, subjects applied force to the cricoid cartilage as was customary to them. Secondly, subjects used the device to guide the application of that force. Thirdly, subjects were again asked to perform the manoeuvre without visual guidance. Each test lasted 1┬ámin and the amount of force applied was measured throughout. Overall, the Sellick maneuver was often not applied properly, with large variance between individual subjects. Performance and inter-subject consistency improved to a very highly significant degree when subjects were able to use the device as a visual guide (p < 0.001). Subsequent significant improvements in performances during the last, unguided test demonstrated that the device initiated learning. (paper)}
doi = {10.1088/0967-3334/34/12/1645}
journal = {Physiological Measurement (Print)}
issue = {12}
volume = {34}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2013}
month = {Dec}
}