You need JavaScript to view this

A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

Abstract

A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small  More>>
Authors:
Djordjevic, Marko; [1]  Djordjevic, Magdalena [2] 
  1. Institute of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade (Serbia)
  2. Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade (Serbia)
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 2012
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Biology (Online); Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; BIOLOGY; DISTURBANCES; MOLECULES; PRECURSOR; SUBSTRATES; TOXICITY
OSTI ID:
22466494
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 1478-3975; TRN: GB13J2498036279
Availability:
Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1478-3975/9/5/056004
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
[6 page(s)]
Announcement Date:
Apr 30, 2016

Citation Formats

Djordjevic, Marko, and Djordjevic, Magdalena. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts. United Kingdom: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1088/1478-3975/9/5/056004.
Djordjevic, Marko, & Djordjevic, Magdalena. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts. United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/1478-3975/9/5/056004.
Djordjevic, Marko, and Djordjevic, Magdalena. 2012. "A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts." United Kingdom. doi:10.1088/1478-3975/9/5/056004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1088/1478-3975/9/5/056004.
@misc{etde_22466494,
title = {A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts}
author = {Djordjevic, Marko, and Djordjevic, Magdalena}
abstractNote = {A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways. (paper)}
doi = {10.1088/1478-3975/9/5/056004}
journal = {Physical Biology (Online)}
issue = {5}
volume = {9}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2012}
month = {Oct}
}