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CORNELL: Synchrotron 25

Abstract

A recent celebration marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Cornell Electron Synchrotron. The major milestone in the commissioning of the synchrotron was on October 11, 1967 when Helen Edwards, Boyce McDaniel, and Maury Tigner achieved a 7 GeV beam, a worldrecord energy for electron synchrotrons at that time. Like so many advances in experimental physics, this occurred early in the morning - 3 a.m.! The transition from accelerator commissioning to high energy physics operation was extremely rapid; 7 GeV operation for data collection was routine just five weeks later. Throughout its life as a source of photon and electron beams for fixed target experiments, the synchrotron maintained energy leadership for circular electron machines. Originally designed for operation at 10 GeV, eventually it consistently provided beams for experiments at energies up to 11.6 GeV. It now operates at 5 GeV, serving as the injector for the CESR electron-positron storage ring. Robert Wilson was director of the laboratory during the design and most of the construction of the machine. He left near the end of the construction to become the first director of Fermilab and was replaced by Boyce McDaniel, who guided the laboratory from the completion of the synchrotron to the  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 15, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-15A0881
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: 2 figs.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; CESR STORAGE RING; COMMISSIONING; CONSTRUCTION; CORNELL 10-GEV SYNCHROTRON; ELECTRON BEAMS; FERMILAB; GEV RANGE 01-10; GEV RANGE 10-100
OSTI ID:
22458884
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC15A0881028479
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732120/files/vol33-issue2-p002-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 2-4
Announcement Date:
Mar 25, 2016

Citation Formats

Anon. CORNELL: Synchrotron 25. CERN: N. p., 1993. Web.
Anon. CORNELL: Synchrotron 25. CERN.
Anon. 1993. "CORNELL: Synchrotron 25." CERN.
@misc{etde_22458884,
title = {CORNELL: Synchrotron 25}
author = {Anon.}
abstractNote = {A recent celebration marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Cornell Electron Synchrotron. The major milestone in the commissioning of the synchrotron was on October 11, 1967 when Helen Edwards, Boyce McDaniel, and Maury Tigner achieved a 7 GeV beam, a worldrecord energy for electron synchrotrons at that time. Like so many advances in experimental physics, this occurred early in the morning - 3 a.m.! The transition from accelerator commissioning to high energy physics operation was extremely rapid; 7 GeV operation for data collection was routine just five weeks later. Throughout its life as a source of photon and electron beams for fixed target experiments, the synchrotron maintained energy leadership for circular electron machines. Originally designed for operation at 10 GeV, eventually it consistently provided beams for experiments at energies up to 11.6 GeV. It now operates at 5 GeV, serving as the injector for the CESR electron-positron storage ring. Robert Wilson was director of the laboratory during the design and most of the construction of the machine. He left near the end of the construction to become the first director of Fermilab and was replaced by Boyce McDaniel, who guided the laboratory from the completion of the synchrotron to the construction and early operation of CESR. Wilson recalled how the laboratory had originally proposed a 3 GeV turnkey machine to be built entirely by industry and would fit in the space previously occupied by earlier Cornell accelerators. However, members of the laboratory realized that 3 GeV would not open new physics frontiers, that the construction of the accelerator was much of the fun of doing high energy physics experiments, and that a more challenging project was needed. This led to the proposal for the 10 GeV synchrotron which was built in the ''Cornell Style'' with many of the components fabricated and nearly all of the assembly done at Cornell.}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {2}
volume = {33}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1993}
month = {Mar}
}