You need JavaScript to view this

UNDERGROUND

Abstract

Full text: Cossetted deep underground, sheltered from cosmic ray noise, has always been a favourite haunt of neutrino physicists. Already in the 1930s, significant limits were obtained by taking a geiger counter down in Holborn 'tube' station, one of the deepest in London's underground system. Since then, neutrino physicists have popped up in many unlikely places - gold mines, salt mines, and road tunnels deep under mountain chains. Two such locations - the 1MB (Irvine/ Michigan/Brookhaven) detector 600 metres below ground in an Ohio salt mine, and the Kamiokande apparatus 1000m underground 300 km west of Tokyo - picked up neutrinos on 23 February 1987 from the famous 1987A supernova. Purpose-built underground laboratories have made life easier, notably the Italian Gran Sasso Laboratory near Rome, 1.4 kilometres below the surface, and the Russian Baksan Neutrino Observatory under Mount Andyrchi in the Caucasus range. Gran Sasso houses ICARUS (April, page 15), Gallex, Borexino, Macro and the LVD Large Volume Detector, while Baksan is the home of the SAGE gallium-based solar neutrino experiment. Elsewhere, important ongoing underground neutrino experiments include Soudan II in the US (April, page 16), the Canadian Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with its heavy water target (January 1990, page 23),  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Nov 15, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-15A0973
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 9; Other Information: 1 fig.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; COSMIC RADIATION; GALLIUM; HEAVY WATER; NEUTRINO DETECTION; SOLAR NEUTRINOS; SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY; UNDERGROUND
OSTI ID:
22454656
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC15A0973024201
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732212/files/vol33-issue9-p039-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 39
Announcement Date:
Mar 24, 2016

Citation Formats

Anon. UNDERGROUND. CERN: N. p., 1993. Web.
Anon. UNDERGROUND. CERN.
Anon. 1993. "UNDERGROUND." CERN.
@misc{etde_22454656,
title = {UNDERGROUND}
author = {Anon.}
abstractNote = {Full text: Cossetted deep underground, sheltered from cosmic ray noise, has always been a favourite haunt of neutrino physicists. Already in the 1930s, significant limits were obtained by taking a geiger counter down in Holborn 'tube' station, one of the deepest in London's underground system. Since then, neutrino physicists have popped up in many unlikely places - gold mines, salt mines, and road tunnels deep under mountain chains. Two such locations - the 1MB (Irvine/ Michigan/Brookhaven) detector 600 metres below ground in an Ohio salt mine, and the Kamiokande apparatus 1000m underground 300 km west of Tokyo - picked up neutrinos on 23 February 1987 from the famous 1987A supernova. Purpose-built underground laboratories have made life easier, notably the Italian Gran Sasso Laboratory near Rome, 1.4 kilometres below the surface, and the Russian Baksan Neutrino Observatory under Mount Andyrchi in the Caucasus range. Gran Sasso houses ICARUS (April, page 15), Gallex, Borexino, Macro and the LVD Large Volume Detector, while Baksan is the home of the SAGE gallium-based solar neutrino experiment. Elsewhere, important ongoing underground neutrino experiments include Soudan II in the US (April, page 16), the Canadian Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with its heavy water target (January 1990, page 23), and Superkamiokande in Japan (May 1991, page 8)}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {9}
volume = {33}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1993}
month = {Nov}
}