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Unification, small and large

Abstract

Full text: Fruitful exchanges between particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology have become a common feature in the last decade. In January, Coral Gables near Miami was the stage for a 'Unified Symmetry in the Small and the Large' meeting. Coral Gables is a famous physics venue. In January 1964, the year that the quark model of hadrons emerged, Behram Kursunoglu initiated a series of particle physics meetings that continued for 20 years and formed a regular focus for this development. The final such meeting was in 1983, coinciding with both the 80th birthday of field theory pioneer Paul Dirac, who worked in Florida towards the end of his career, and the discovery of the W bosons at CERN. The resurrected Coral Gables meeting began with historical accounts of the emergence of Big Bang cosmology, by Robert Ralph and Herman Alpher, while Andrei Linde proposed our expanding universe as a small part of a stationary system, infinite both in space and in time. The observational status of Big Bang cosmology was reviewed by Bruce Partridge, John Mather and Martin Harwit, emphasizing the cosmic background radiation, where temperature is now measured by the COBE satellite detectors to 2.726 ± 0.01 OK. The  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Apr 15, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-15A0896
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; B QUARKS; C QUARKS; DOUBLE BETA DECAY; GENERAL RELATIVITY THEORY; GRAVITATIONAL LENSES; KAONS; MASS SPECTRA; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS; SOLAR NEUTRINOS; STANDARD MODEL; STRONG INTERACTIONS; SUPERGRAVITY; SUPERSTRING MODELS; SUPERSYMMETRY; SYMMETRY BREAKING; T QUARKS
OSTI ID:
22454616
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC15A0896024161
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732135/files/vol33-issue3-p021b-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 21-22
Announcement Date:
Mar 24, 2016

Citation Formats

Fritzsch, Harald. Unification, small and large. CERN: N. p., 1993. Web.
Fritzsch, Harald. Unification, small and large. CERN.
Fritzsch, Harald. 1993. "Unification, small and large." CERN.
@misc{etde_22454616,
title = {Unification, small and large}
author = {Fritzsch, Harald}
abstractNote = {Full text: Fruitful exchanges between particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology have become a common feature in the last decade. In January, Coral Gables near Miami was the stage for a 'Unified Symmetry in the Small and the Large' meeting. Coral Gables is a famous physics venue. In January 1964, the year that the quark model of hadrons emerged, Behram Kursunoglu initiated a series of particle physics meetings that continued for 20 years and formed a regular focus for this development. The final such meeting was in 1983, coinciding with both the 80th birthday of field theory pioneer Paul Dirac, who worked in Florida towards the end of his career, and the discovery of the W bosons at CERN. The resurrected Coral Gables meeting began with historical accounts of the emergence of Big Bang cosmology, by Robert Ralph and Herman Alpher, while Andrei Linde proposed our expanding universe as a small part of a stationary system, infinite both in space and in time. The observational status of Big Bang cosmology was reviewed by Bruce Partridge, John Mather and Martin Harwit, emphasizing the cosmic background radiation, where temperature is now measured by the COBE satellite detectors to 2.726 ± 0.01 OK. The tiny fluctuations observed by COBE pose problems for standard cold dark matter models. Edward ('Rocky') Kolb reported on new studies on the electroweak phase transition, based on an analogy with the physics of liquid crystals. Richard Holman discussed the fate of global symmetries at energies near the Planck (grand unification) energy, and Paul Steinhardt talked about tensorial and scalar metric fluctuations in the light of the COBE results. Anthony Tyson gave an impressive description of dark matter studies using gravitational lensing, now emerging as a unique tool for indirectly observing intervening dark matter. A neutrino mass of 10 electronvolts could account for observed dark matter distributions, but fails to provide the necessary seeds for galaxy formation. A conservative limit for the cosmic mass density (Ω) is 0.2. Theoretical problems of gravity and cosmology were dealt with by Behram Kursunoglu, Robert Brandenberger and Katherine Freese. Leonard Susskind emphasized the clash between general relativity and quantum theory arising through black hole singularities and their evaporation. Louise Dolan, Pran Nath and A. Jevicki looked at supergravity and superstring theories. In the neutrino physics session chaired by Frederick Reines, Paul Langacker and Stephen Mintz reviewed the status of the solar neutrino problem, while Frank Avignone reported on the ongoing search for neutrinoless double-beta decay, providing an upper limit of 1.4 eV on a Majorana neutrino mass. Pierre Sikivie covered the ongoing search for axions. After a theoretical introduction by Boris Kayser, the programmes of CPviolation studies, including the Bparticle sector, at electron-positron colliders and at hadron machines, were outlined by Jonathan Dorfan and Vera Lueth respectively. While Dallas Kennedy reported on sensitive radiative electroweak corrections, Edward York-Peng Yao and Martin Einhorn looked at the growing use of effective Lagrangians to describe heavy particles at low energy. Alan Krisch emphasized the importance of polarized beams for strong interaction studies, especially nonperturbative quark field theory (QCD) effects, and Frederick Zachariasen described new analytic methods to derive the heavy quark potential. Chiral QCD liquids and their role in the physics of heavy nuclei and neutron stars were covered by Brian Lynn. E.C.G. Sudarshan described a new way to look at the decays of kaons. Stephen Pinsky, Charles Thorn and Mark Samuel looked at special particle topics, while Peter Carruthers described galaxy distributions in an unconventional way, linking them to the properties of multihadron spectra. A substantial part of the time was given to speculations on the nature and origin of Standard Model constants, especially fermion masses. After an introduction by Yoichiro Nambu, Sydney Meshkov, Harald Fritzsch and Pierre Ramond outlined a new view of quark and lepton mass spectra as signals of new types of broken symmetries, opening a possible window to physics beyond the Standard Ivlodel. Gordon Kane reviewed supersymmetric possibilities at high energies. The revived Coral Gables meetings will now continue, hopefully seeing the emergence of physics beyond the Standard Model. This year's meeting was organized by Behram Kursunoglu of Coral Gables' Global Foundation, assisted by Sydney Meshkov (SSC), Stephen Mintz (Florida) and Arnold Perlmutter (Miami)}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {3}
volume = {33}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1993}
month = {Apr}
}