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CERN: Fixed target targets

Abstract

Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 15, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-15A0880
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: 1 fig.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; CERN; CERN LHC; CP INVARIANCE; HEAVY IONS; HYPERON BEAMS; IHEP; LEP STORAGE RINGS; MUON BEAMS; NEUTRINO BEAMS; NEUTRINO OSCILLATION; NEUTRONS; SOLAR NEUTRINOS
OSTI ID:
22454605
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC15A0880024150
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1732119/files/vol33-issue2-p001-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 1-2
Announcement Date:
Mar 24, 2016

Citation Formats

Anon. CERN: Fixed target targets. CERN: N. p., 1993. Web.
Anon. CERN: Fixed target targets. CERN.
Anon. 1993. "CERN: Fixed target targets." CERN.
@misc{etde_22454605,
title = {CERN: Fixed target targets}
author = {Anon.}
abstractNote = {Full text: While the immediate priority of CERN's research programme is to exploit to the full the world's largest accelerator, the LEP electron-positron collider and its concomitant LEP200 energy upgrade (January, page 1), CERN is also mindful of its long tradition of diversified research. Away from LEP and preparations for the LHC proton-proton collider to be built above LEP in the same 27-kilometre tunnel, CERN is also preparing for a new generation of heavy ion experiments using a new source, providing heavier ions (April 1992, page 8), with first physics expected next year. CERN's smallest accelerator, the LEAR Low Energy Antiproton Ring continues to cover a wide range of research topics, and saw a record number of hours of operation in 1992. The new ISOLDE on-line isotope separator was inaugurated last year (July, page 5) and physics is already underway. The remaining effort concentrates around fixed target experiments at the SPS synchrotron, which formed the main thrust of CERN's research during the late 1970s. With the SPS and LEAR now approaching middle age, their research future was extensively studied last year. Broadly, a vigorous SPS programme looks assured until at least the end of 1995. Decisions for the longer term future of the West Experimental Area of the SPS will have to take into account the heavy demand for test beams from work towards experiments at big colliders, both at CERN and elsewhere. The North Experimental Area is the scene of larger experiments with longer lead times. Several more years of LEAR exploitation are already in the pipeline, but for the longer term, the ambitious Superlear project for a superconducting ring (January 1992, page 7) did not catch on. Neutrino physics has a long tradition at CERN, and this continues with the preparations for two major projects, the Chorus and Nomad experiments (November 1991, page 7), to start next year in the West Area. Delicate neutrino oscillation effects could become visible for the first time, and help explain the continuing dilemma of the dearth of solar neutrinos (December 1992, page 12). For the longer term future, a larger detector could provide an increased yield, boosting the neutrino capture rate by up to a factor of ten. Other, more spectacular, option is to shine the CERN neutrino beam towards a detector a long way off. Such a beam is practically unimpeded by matter and could pass right through the earth. Possible contenders for underground target stations equipped with big detectors are the Italian Gran Sasso laboratory, 730 kilometres south, or Superkamiokande, 8750 kilometres away in Japan. Other major ongoing 'flagship' SPS projects include the NA48 experiment to continue precision measurements on the still unexplained phenomenon of CP violation (March 1992, page 7) and the 'Spin Muon Collaboration' looking to probe the spin structure of the proton and the neutron using high energy muon beams (April 1992, page 21). Both these experiments address important physics issues. While SMC is already taking data, NA48 will not become operational until 1995, but should run then for more than three years. Elsewhere at the SPS, ongoing studies include a programme using hyperon beams, and a study of beauty particles (WA92) which would be hampered once the new neutrino programme starts. The spectroscopy of particles containing light quarks, although far from having solved all outstanding questions, is slowly coming to the end of its SPS career. The WA91 glueball search at the big Omega detector will continue taking data in 1994. The GAMS experiment took its final CERN data last year. One of the long-standing examples of CERN-Russian collaboration, GAMS earned its acronym from the Russian abbreviation for its characteristic large lead-glass arrays. GAMS experiments have run both at CERN and at Serpukhov's Institute for High Energy Physics near Moscow.}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {2}
volume = {33}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1993}
month = {Mar}
}