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Effects of chronic γ-irradiation on growth and survival of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus

Abstract

The Tohoku hynobiid salamanders, Hynobius lichenatus, were chronically irradiated with γ-rays from embryonic to juvenile stages for 450 days. At 490 μGy h{sup −1} or lower dose rates, growth and survival were not significantly affected by irradiation, and any morphological aberrations and histological damages were not observed. At 4600 μGy h{sup −1}, growth was severely inhibited, and all the individuals died mostly at the juvenile stage. Chronic LD{sub 50} was 42 Gy as a total dose. In the liver, the number of hematopoietic cells was significantly reduced in the living juveniles, and these cells disappeared in the dead juveniles. In the spleen, mature lymphocytes were depleted in the living larvae, and almost all the heamtopoietic cells disappeared in the dead juveniles. These results suggest that this salamander died due to acute radiation syndrome, i.e., hematopoietic damage and subsequent sepsis caused by immune depression. The death would be also attributed to skin damage inducing infection. At 18,000 μGy h{sup −1}, morphological aberrations and severe growth inhibition were observed. All the individuals died at the larval stage due to a multiple organ failure. Chronic LD{sub 50} was 28 Gy as a total dose. Assuming that chronic LD{sub 50} was 42 Gy at  More>>
Authors:
Fuma, Shoichi; [1]  Une, Yumi; [2]  Ihara, Sadao; [3]  Matsui, Kumi; [4]  Kudo, Tomoo; Tokiwa, Toshihiro; [2]  Kubota, Yoshihisa; Soeda, Haruhi; [1]  Ishikawa, Takahiro; [5]  Doi, Kazutaka; [6]  Watanabe, Yoshito; Yoshida, Satoshi [1] 
  1. Project for Environmental Dynamics and Radiation Effects, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 Japan (Japan)
  2. Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5201 (Japan)
  3. Hokkaido University of Education Kushiro Campus, 1-15-55 Shiroyama, Kushiro, Hokkaido 085-8580 Japan (Japan)
  4. Laboratory of Veterinary Physiology 1, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5201 (Japan)
  5. Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Centre, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 Japan (Japan)
  6. Project for Human Health, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 Japan (Japan)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2014
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Environmental Radioactivity; Journal Volume: 135; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CHRONIC IRRADIATION; DOSE RATES; ECOSYSTEMS; FAILURES; FORMATION DAMAGE; GROWTH; IRRADIATION; LARVAE; LETHAL DOSES; LIVER; LOW DOSE IRRADIATION; LYMPHOCYTES; RADIATION SYNDROME; SALAMANDERS; SPLEEN
OSTI ID:
22441246
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0265-931X; CODEN: JERAEE; Other: PII: S0265-931X(14)00105-2; TRN: GB15R7577010787
Availability:
Available from http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvrad.2014.04.001
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 84-92
Announcement Date:
Mar 10, 2016

Citation Formats

Fuma, Shoichi, Une, Yumi, Ihara, Sadao, Matsui, Kumi, Kudo, Tomoo, Tokiwa, Toshihiro, Kubota, Yoshihisa, Soeda, Haruhi, Ishikawa, Takahiro, Doi, Kazutaka, Watanabe, Yoshito, and Yoshida, Satoshi. Effects of chronic γ-irradiation on growth and survival of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus. United Kingdom: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.JENVRAD.2014.04.001.
Fuma, Shoichi, Une, Yumi, Ihara, Sadao, Matsui, Kumi, Kudo, Tomoo, Tokiwa, Toshihiro, Kubota, Yoshihisa, Soeda, Haruhi, Ishikawa, Takahiro, Doi, Kazutaka, Watanabe, Yoshito, & Yoshida, Satoshi. Effects of chronic γ-irradiation on growth and survival of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.JENVRAD.2014.04.001.
Fuma, Shoichi, Une, Yumi, Ihara, Sadao, Matsui, Kumi, Kudo, Tomoo, Tokiwa, Toshihiro, Kubota, Yoshihisa, Soeda, Haruhi, Ishikawa, Takahiro, Doi, Kazutaka, Watanabe, Yoshito, and Yoshida, Satoshi. 2014. "Effects of chronic γ-irradiation on growth and survival of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/J.JENVRAD.2014.04.001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/J.JENVRAD.2014.04.001.
@misc{etde_22441246,
title = {Effects of chronic γ-irradiation on growth and survival of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus}
author = {Fuma, Shoichi, Une, Yumi, Ihara, Sadao, Matsui, Kumi, Kudo, Tomoo, Tokiwa, Toshihiro, Kubota, Yoshihisa, Soeda, Haruhi, Ishikawa, Takahiro, Doi, Kazutaka, Watanabe, Yoshito, and Yoshida, Satoshi}
abstractNote = {The Tohoku hynobiid salamanders, Hynobius lichenatus, were chronically irradiated with γ-rays from embryonic to juvenile stages for 450 days. At 490 μGy h{sup −1} or lower dose rates, growth and survival were not significantly affected by irradiation, and any morphological aberrations and histological damages were not observed. At 4600 μGy h{sup −1}, growth was severely inhibited, and all the individuals died mostly at the juvenile stage. Chronic LD{sub 50} was 42 Gy as a total dose. In the liver, the number of hematopoietic cells was significantly reduced in the living juveniles, and these cells disappeared in the dead juveniles. In the spleen, mature lymphocytes were depleted in the living larvae, and almost all the heamtopoietic cells disappeared in the dead juveniles. These results suggest that this salamander died due to acute radiation syndrome, i.e., hematopoietic damage and subsequent sepsis caused by immune depression. The death would be also attributed to skin damage inducing infection. At 18,000 μGy h{sup −1}, morphological aberrations and severe growth inhibition were observed. All the individuals died at the larval stage due to a multiple organ failure. Chronic LD{sub 50} was 28 Gy as a total dose. Assuming that chronic LD{sub 50} was 42 Gy at lower dose rates than 4600 μGy h{sup −1}, a chronic median lethal dose rate could be estimated to be <340 μGy h{sup −1} for the whole life (>14 years). These results suggest that, among guidance dose rates, i.e., 4–400 μGy h{sup −1}, proposed by various organisations and research programmes for protection of amphibians and taxonomic groups or ecosystems including amphibians, most of them would protect this salamander but the highest value may not on the whole life scale. - Highlights: • The salamanders, Hynobius lichenatus, were chronically γ-irradiated for 450 days. • At 490 μGy h{sup −1} or lower, irradiation did not significantly affect growth and survival. • All the individuals died at 4600 or 18,000 μGy h{sup −1}. • A median lethal dose rate was estimated to be < 340 μGy h{sup −1} for the whole life. • Most guidance dose rates proposed for amphibians would protect this salamander.}
doi = {10.1016/J.JENVRAD.2014.04.001}
journal = {Journal of Environmental Radioactivity}
volume = {135}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {2014}
month = {Sep}
}