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Effects of watertable and fertilizer management on susceptibility of tomato fruit to chilling injury

Journal Article:

Abstract

In a 2-year study (1993-1994), 'New Yorker' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants grown in field lysimeters were subjected to four water table depth (WTD) treatments (0.3, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 m from the soil surface) factorially combined with 5 potassium/calcium fertilization combinations. Mature-green fruit from four replicates of each treatment were stored at 5C for 21 days, and fruit color was monitored with a tristimulus colorimeter. Fruit were subsequently allowed to ripen at 20C for 10 days, at which time chilling injury was assessed on the basis of delayed ripening and area of lesions. Potassium and calcium applied in the field had no effect on chilling tolerance of the fruit. In the drier year (1993), shallower WTD treatments generally yielded fruit that changed color less during chilling and were more chilling-sensitive based on delayed ripening. In the wetter year, differences in color change and chilling tolerance between WTD, if any, were small. Over both years, lesion area varied with WTD, but not in a consistent manner. Based on these results, we suggest that differences in water availability should be considered when studying tomato fruit chilling.
Authors:
Dodds, G. T.; [1]  Trenholm, L.; Madramootoo, C. A.
  1. McGill University, Sainte Anne-de-Bellevue, Que. (Canada)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1996
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science; Journal Volume: 121; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: FAO/AGRIS record; ARN: US9748501; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; FERTILIZATION; FERTILIZERS; IRRIGATION; LYSIMETERS; PLANTS; PRECIPITATION; RIPENING; SOILS; TOLERANCE; TOMATOES
OSTI ID:
22382306
Country of Origin:
FAO
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-1062; TRN: XF15A2398087821
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 525-530
Announcement Date:
Aug 21, 2015

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Dodds, G. T., Trenholm, L., and Madramootoo, C. A. Effects of watertable and fertilizer management on susceptibility of tomato fruit to chilling injury. FAO: N. p., 1996. Web.
Dodds, G. T., Trenholm, L., & Madramootoo, C. A. Effects of watertable and fertilizer management on susceptibility of tomato fruit to chilling injury. FAO.
Dodds, G. T., Trenholm, L., and Madramootoo, C. A. 1996. "Effects of watertable and fertilizer management on susceptibility of tomato fruit to chilling injury." FAO.
@misc{etde_22382306,
title = {Effects of watertable and fertilizer management on susceptibility of tomato fruit to chilling injury}
author = {Dodds, G. T., Trenholm, L., and Madramootoo, C. A.}
abstractNote = {In a 2-year study (1993-1994), 'New Yorker' tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants grown in field lysimeters were subjected to four water table depth (WTD) treatments (0.3, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 m from the soil surface) factorially combined with 5 potassium/calcium fertilization combinations. Mature-green fruit from four replicates of each treatment were stored at 5C for 21 days, and fruit color was monitored with a tristimulus colorimeter. Fruit were subsequently allowed to ripen at 20C for 10 days, at which time chilling injury was assessed on the basis of delayed ripening and area of lesions. Potassium and calcium applied in the field had no effect on chilling tolerance of the fruit. In the drier year (1993), shallower WTD treatments generally yielded fruit that changed color less during chilling and were more chilling-sensitive based on delayed ripening. In the wetter year, differences in color change and chilling tolerance between WTD, if any, were small. Over both years, lesion area varied with WTD, but not in a consistent manner. Based on these results, we suggest that differences in water availability should be considered when studying tomato fruit chilling.}
journal = {Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science}
issue = {3}
volume = {121}
journal type = {AC}
place = {FAO}
year = {1996}
month = {May}
}