You need JavaScript to view this

Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth

Abstract

Cisplatin [DDP, cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II)], a strong cytostatic and antineoplastic agent, was tested on seedlings of cucumber Cucumis sativus L. for its general effect on root development and its particular effects on root cell division and cell growth. DDP was characterized as a radiomimetic compound since both DDP (1·3 × 10{sup -5} M) and γ-irradiation (2·5-10 kGy) drastically and irreversibly stopped development of embryonic lateral root primordia (LRPs) in the radicle by inhibiting both mitotic activity and cell growth. In 20% of the LRPs of DDP-treated roots, cells did not divide at all. Dividing cells completed no more than two cell cycles. These effects were specific because when DDP was available to the roots only at the onset of cell division, cell proliferation and cell growth were similar to that produced by constant incubation. Neither DDP nor γ-irradiation affected non-meristematic cell elongation. It was concluded that cell growth of meristematic cells is closely related to cell division. However, non-meristematic cell growth is independent of DNA damage. This suggests DDP as a tool to reveal these autonomous processes in plants development and to detect tissue compartments in mature plant embryos which contain potentially non-meristematic cells. (author)
Authors:
Dubrovsky, J. G. [1] 
  1. Division of Experimental Biology, Center for Biological Research (CIB), PO Box 128, La Paz, BCS 23000 (Mexico)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Annals of Botany; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 2; Other Information: FAO/AGRIS record; ARN: GB9404544; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMAL TISSUES; CELL DIVISION; CELL PROLIFERATION; COMPARTMENTS; CUCUMBERS; CYTOLOGY; DNA DAMAGES; ELONGATION; EMBRYOS; GAMMA RADIATION; INCUBATION; IRRADIATION; PLANT GROWTH; PLANT TISSUES; PLATINUM; POTENTIALS; ROOTS; SEEDLINGS; TOOLS
OSTI ID:
22366010
Country of Origin:
FAO
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0305-7364; TRN: XF15A2015071342
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/content/72/2/143.full.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 143-149
Announcement Date:
Jul 30, 2015

Citation Formats

Dubrovsky, J. G. Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth. FAO: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1006/anbo.1993.1092.
Dubrovsky, J. G. Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth. FAO. doi:10.1006/anbo.1993.1092.
Dubrovsky, J. G. 1993. "Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth." FAO. doi:10.1006/anbo.1993.1092. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1006/anbo.1993.1092.
@misc{etde_22366010,
title = {Radiomimetic effect of cisplatin on cucumber root development: the relationship between cell division and cell growth}
author = {Dubrovsky, J. G.}
abstractNote = {Cisplatin [DDP, cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II)], a strong cytostatic and antineoplastic agent, was tested on seedlings of cucumber Cucumis sativus L. for its general effect on root development and its particular effects on root cell division and cell growth. DDP was characterized as a radiomimetic compound since both DDP (1·3 × 10{sup -5} M) and γ-irradiation (2·5-10 kGy) drastically and irreversibly stopped development of embryonic lateral root primordia (LRPs) in the radicle by inhibiting both mitotic activity and cell growth. In 20% of the LRPs of DDP-treated roots, cells did not divide at all. Dividing cells completed no more than two cell cycles. These effects were specific because when DDP was available to the roots only at the onset of cell division, cell proliferation and cell growth were similar to that produced by constant incubation. Neither DDP nor γ-irradiation affected non-meristematic cell elongation. It was concluded that cell growth of meristematic cells is closely related to cell division. However, non-meristematic cell growth is independent of DNA damage. This suggests DDP as a tool to reveal these autonomous processes in plants development and to detect tissue compartments in mature plant embryos which contain potentially non-meristematic cells. (author)}
doi = {10.1006/anbo.1993.1092}
journal = {Annals of Botany}
issue = {2}
volume = {72}
journal type = {AC}
place = {FAO}
year = {1993}
month = {Jul}
}