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Special Topics in Radiography. Chapter 10

Abstract

Up to this point, this handbook has described the use of X rays to form 2-D medical images of the 3-D patient. This process of reducing patient information by one dimension results in an image of superimposed tissues where important information might be obscured. Chapter 11 begins a section of the book involving the creation of cross-sectional medical images through computed tomography (CT), ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This Chapter describes a number of special X ray imaging modalities and their associated techniques, and forms a transition between projection and cross-sectional imaging. The first of these special topics is dental radiography, which is characterized by a diversity of technology and innovation. The common intraoral radiograph of a single tooth has seen little fundamental change since the time of Roentgen and is, today, along with the simple chest radiograph, the most commonly performed radiographic examination. By contrast, the challenge to create an image of all the teeth simultaneously has placed dentistry at the cutting edge of technology, through the development of panographic techniques and, most recently, with the application of cone beam CT (CBCT). Moreover, the small size of the tooth and the consequent reduced need for X ray generation  More>>
Authors:
Mclean, I. D.; [1]  Shepherd, J. A. [2] 
  1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
  2. University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, United States of America (United States)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 2014
Product Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs., figs.; Related Information: In: Diagnostic radiology physics: A handbook for teachers and students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics| by Dance, D.R. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford (United Kingdom)]; Christofides, S. [New Nicosia General Hospital (Cyprus)]; Maidment, A.D.A. [University of Pennsylvania (United States)]; McLean, I.D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)]; Ng, K.H. (ed.) [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]| 710 p.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANIMAL TISSUES; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; IMAGES; NMR IMAGING; OSTEOPOROSIS; RECEPTORS; SKELETON; TEETH; X-RAY SOURCES
OSTI ID:
22360633
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-131010-1; TRN: XA14M6983065927
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1564webNew-74666420.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 241-255
Announcement Date:
Jul 28, 2015

Citation Formats

Mclean, I. D., and Shepherd, J. A. Special Topics in Radiography. Chapter 10. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Mclean, I. D., & Shepherd, J. A. Special Topics in Radiography. Chapter 10. IAEA.
Mclean, I. D., and Shepherd, J. A. 2014. "Special Topics in Radiography. Chapter 10." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22360633,
title = {Special Topics in Radiography. Chapter 10}
author = {Mclean, I. D., and Shepherd, J. A.}
abstractNote = {Up to this point, this handbook has described the use of X rays to form 2-D medical images of the 3-D patient. This process of reducing patient information by one dimension results in an image of superimposed tissues where important information might be obscured. Chapter 11 begins a section of the book involving the creation of cross-sectional medical images through computed tomography (CT), ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This Chapter describes a number of special X ray imaging modalities and their associated techniques, and forms a transition between projection and cross-sectional imaging. The first of these special topics is dental radiography, which is characterized by a diversity of technology and innovation. The common intraoral radiograph of a single tooth has seen little fundamental change since the time of Roentgen and is, today, along with the simple chest radiograph, the most commonly performed radiographic examination. By contrast, the challenge to create an image of all the teeth simultaneously has placed dentistry at the cutting edge of technology, through the development of panographic techniques and, most recently, with the application of cone beam CT (CBCT). Moreover, the small size of the tooth and the consequent reduced need for X ray generation power promotes equipment mobility. The effect of the need for equipment mobility also forms a special topic that is examined in this chapter. Quantification of the composition of the body is another special X ray imaging technique. Dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA) is primarily used to derive the mass of one material in the presence of another, through knowledge of their unique X ray attenuation at different energies. DXA’s primary commercial application has been to measure body mineral density as an assessment of fracture risk and to diagnose osteoporosis; thus, the X ray energies used are optimized for bone density assessment. Currently, there are estimated to be over 50 000 whole body DXA systems in use worldwide. Lastly, this chapter reviews the process of sectional image formation through non-computational methods with the use of relative motion of the X ray source and image receptor.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Sep}
}