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Muon-catalyzed fusion revisited

Abstract

A negative muon can induce nuclear fusion in the reaction of deuteron and triton nuclei giving a helium nucleus, a neutron and an emerging negative muon. The muon forms a tightlybound deuteron-triton-muon molecule and fusion follows in about 10{sup -12}s. Then the muon is free again to induce further reactions. Thus the muon can serve as a catalyst for nuclear fusion, which can proceed without the need for the high temperatures which are needed in the confinement and inertial fusion schemes. At room temperature, up to 80 fusions per muon have recently been observed at the LAMPF machine at Los Alamos, and it is clear that this number can be exceeded. These and other results were presented at a summer Workshop on Muon-Catalyzed Fusion held in Jackson, Wyoming. Approximately fifty scientists attended from Austria, Canada, India, Italy, Japan, South Africa, West Germany, and the United States. The Workshop itself is symbolic of the revival of interest in this subject.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 15, 1984
Product Type:
Journal Article
Report Number:
INIS-XC-J-15P0201
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CERN Courier; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; DEUTERONS; HELIUM; ICF DEVICES; LAMPF II SYNCHROTRON; MUONS; NEUTRONS; NUCLEI; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS; TRITONS
OSTI ID:
22351985
Country of Origin:
CERN
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0304-288X; CODEN: CECOA2; TRN: XC15P0201058336
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://cds.cern.ch/record/1730992/files/vol24-issue10-p439-e.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 439
Announcement Date:
Jul 18, 2015

Citation Formats

Anon. Muon-catalyzed fusion revisited. CERN: N. p., 1984. Web.
Anon. Muon-catalyzed fusion revisited. CERN.
Anon. 1984. "Muon-catalyzed fusion revisited." CERN.
@misc{etde_22351985,
title = {Muon-catalyzed fusion revisited}
author = {Anon.}
abstractNote = {A negative muon can induce nuclear fusion in the reaction of deuteron and triton nuclei giving a helium nucleus, a neutron and an emerging negative muon. The muon forms a tightlybound deuteron-triton-muon molecule and fusion follows in about 10{sup -12}s. Then the muon is free again to induce further reactions. Thus the muon can serve as a catalyst for nuclear fusion, which can proceed without the need for the high temperatures which are needed in the confinement and inertial fusion schemes. At room temperature, up to 80 fusions per muon have recently been observed at the LAMPF machine at Los Alamos, and it is clear that this number can be exceeded. These and other results were presented at a summer Workshop on Muon-Catalyzed Fusion held in Jackson, Wyoming. Approximately fifty scientists attended from Austria, Canada, India, Italy, Japan, South Africa, West Germany, and the United States. The Workshop itself is symbolic of the revival of interest in this subject.}
journal = {CERN Courier}
issue = {10}
volume = {24}
journal type = {AC}
place = {CERN}
year = {1984}
month = {Dec}
}