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Transferring alien genes to wheat

Journal Article:

Abstract

In broad terms an alien gene can be considered to be any gene transferred to wheat from a related species. As described above by Maan (section 7D) the genus Triticum contains a broad range of species, some of which cross readily with the cultivated tetraploid (T. Turgidum L.) or hexaploid (T. aestivum L.) wheats, and others only with great difficulty. In addition, wheat will also cross with species in a number of other genera including Agropyron, Elymus, Elytrigia (=Agropyron), Haynaldia, Hordeum, and Secale (Riley and Kimber, 1966; Knobloch, 1968; Feldman and Sears, 1981). In discussing the Triticum and Aegilops spp., the classification by Kimber and Sears, section SA-I, above, will be followed. For the Agropyron and related species the classification described by Dewey (1983) will be used. To avoid confusion, in referring to the literature the designations used by the authors will be given, followed by the new designation. The wild relatives of wheat are adapted to a broad range of environments and carry a large reservoir of useful genes (Zohary et al., 1969; Kerber and Dyck, 1973; Brezhnev, 1977; Feldman and Sears, 1981; Limin and Fowler, 1981; Sharma et aI., 1981; McGuire and Dvorak, 1981). Initially they were considered  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1987
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Agronomy; Journal Issue: 13; Other Information: FAO/AGRIS record; ARN: US8849035; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BARLEY; CHROMOSOMES; DISEASE RESISTANCE; DROUGHT RESISTANCE; GENES; PRODUCTIVITY; PROTEINS; RYE; SALTS; SCREENING; WHEAT
OSTI ID:
22340599
Country of Origin:
FAO
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0065-4663; TRN: XF15A1766046915
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 462-471
Announcement Date:
Jun 15, 2015

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Knott, D. R. Transferring alien genes to wheat. FAO: N. p., 1987. Web.
Knott, D. R. Transferring alien genes to wheat. FAO.
Knott, D. R. 1987. "Transferring alien genes to wheat." FAO.
@misc{etde_22340599,
title = {Transferring alien genes to wheat}
author = {Knott, D. R.}
abstractNote = {In broad terms an alien gene can be considered to be any gene transferred to wheat from a related species. As described above by Maan (section 7D) the genus Triticum contains a broad range of species, some of which cross readily with the cultivated tetraploid (T. Turgidum L.) or hexaploid (T. aestivum L.) wheats, and others only with great difficulty. In addition, wheat will also cross with species in a number of other genera including Agropyron, Elymus, Elytrigia (=Agropyron), Haynaldia, Hordeum, and Secale (Riley and Kimber, 1966; Knobloch, 1968; Feldman and Sears, 1981). In discussing the Triticum and Aegilops spp., the classification by Kimber and Sears, section SA-I, above, will be followed. For the Agropyron and related species the classification described by Dewey (1983) will be used. To avoid confusion, in referring to the literature the designations used by the authors will be given, followed by the new designation. The wild relatives of wheat are adapted to a broad range of environments and carry a large reservoir of useful genes (Zohary et al., 1969; Kerber and Dyck, 1973; Brezhnev, 1977; Feldman and Sears, 1981; Limin and Fowler, 1981; Sharma et aI., 1981; McGuire and Dvorak, 1981). Initially they were considered to be primarily sources of disease resistance, but more recently they have been recognized as potential sources of genes for high protein, cold tolerance, salt tolerance, drought tolerance, lodging resistance, early maturity, and even yield. Extensive screening of the wild relatives of wheat needs to be done before their useful genes can be fully utilized.}
journal = {Agronomy}
issue = {13}
journal type = {AC}
place = {FAO}
year = {1987}
month = {Jul}
}