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Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19

Abstract

Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.
Authors:
Flux, G.; Du, Yong [1] 
  1. Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Dec 15, 2014
Product Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 2 figs.; Related Information: In: Nuclear Medicine Physics: A Handbook for Teachers and Students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Asia–Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (AFOMP), Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM), European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), Federation of African Medical Physics Organisations (FAMPO), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB)| by Bailey, D.L.; Humm, J.L.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Aswegen, A. van (eds.)| 766 p.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ABSORBED RADIATION DOSES; ACCURACY; DOSIMETRY; EDUCATION; IODINE 131; LICENSES; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; NEOPLASMS; PATIENTS; PHOSPHORUS 32; QUALITY CONTROL; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; RADIOTHERAPY; UNSEALED SOURCES
OSTI ID:
22327870
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-143810-2; TRN: XA15M0099034097
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1617web-1294055.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 641-657
Announcement Date:
May 05, 2015

Citation Formats

Flux, G., and Du, Yong. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Flux, G., & Du, Yong. Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19. IAEA.
Flux, G., and Du, Yong. 2014. "Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22327870,
title = {Radionuclide Therapy. Chapter 19}
author = {Flux, G., and Du, Yong}
abstractNote = {Cancer has been treated with radiopharmaceuticals since the 1940s. The radionuclides originally used, including 131I and 32P, are still in use. The role of the physicist in radionuclide therapy encompasses radiation protection, imaging and dosimetry. Radiation protection is of particular importance given the high activities of the unsealed sources that are often administered, and must take into account medical staff, comforters and carers, and, as patients are discharged while still retaining activity, members of the public. Regulations concerning acceptable levels of exposure vary from country to country. If the administered radiopharmaceutical is a γ emitter, then imaging can be performed which may be either qualitative or quantitative. While a regular system of quality control must be in place to prevent misinterpretation of image data, qualitative imaging does not usually rely on the image corrections necessary to determine the absolute levels of activity that are localized in the patient. Accurate quantitative imaging is dependent on these corrections and can permit the distribution of absorbed doses delivered to the patient to be determined with sufficient accuracy to be clinically beneficial.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Dec}
}