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Functional Measurements in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 16

Abstract

The strength of nuclear medicine lies in using the tracer method to acquire information about how an organ is or is not functioning as it should. This modality, therefore, focuses on physiological organ function for diagnoses and not on anatomical information such as X ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging. The three aspects involved in the process are: (i) choice of radioactive tracer, (ii) method of detection of the emissions from the tracer, and (iii) analysis of the results of the detection. The radioactive tracers on which nuclear medicine (or molecular imaging as it is increasingly being called) is based are designed to participate in or ‘trace’ a chosen function of the body. Their distribution is then found by detecting and locating the emissions, usually γ photons, of the radioactive tracer. The tracer may be involved in a metabolic process, such as iodine in the thyroid, or it may take part in a physiological process because of its physical make-up, such as macroaggregate of albumin (MAA) in the lungs.
Authors:
Myers, M. J. [1] 
  1. Institute of Clinical Sciences, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Dec 15, 2014
Product Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 5 figs.; Related Information: In: Nuclear Medicine Physics: A Handbook for Teachers and Students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Asia–Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (AFOMP), Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM), European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), Federation of African Medical Physics Organisations (FAMPO), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB)| by Bailey, D.L.; Humm, J.L.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Aswegen, A. van (eds.)| 766 p.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALBUMINS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSIS; IODINE; LUNGS; NMR IMAGING; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; THYROID; TRACER TECHNIQUES; X RADIATION
OSTI ID:
22327867
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-143810-2; TRN: XA15M0096034094
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1617web-1294055.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 587-607
Announcement Date:
May 02, 2015

Citation Formats

Myers, M. J. Functional Measurements in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 16. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Myers, M. J. Functional Measurements in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 16. IAEA.
Myers, M. J. 2014. "Functional Measurements in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 16." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22327867,
title = {Functional Measurements in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 16}
author = {Myers, M. J.}
abstractNote = {The strength of nuclear medicine lies in using the tracer method to acquire information about how an organ is or is not functioning as it should. This modality, therefore, focuses on physiological organ function for diagnoses and not on anatomical information such as X ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging. The three aspects involved in the process are: (i) choice of radioactive tracer, (ii) method of detection of the emissions from the tracer, and (iii) analysis of the results of the detection. The radioactive tracers on which nuclear medicine (or molecular imaging as it is increasingly being called) is based are designed to participate in or ‘trace’ a chosen function of the body. Their distribution is then found by detecting and locating the emissions, usually γ photons, of the radioactive tracer. The tracer may be involved in a metabolic process, such as iodine in the thyroid, or it may take part in a physiological process because of its physical make-up, such as macroaggregate of albumin (MAA) in the lungs.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Dec}
}