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Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7

Abstract

Nuclear medicine imaging is generally based on the detection of X rays and γ rays emitted by radionuclides injected into a patient. In the previous chapter, the methods used to detect these photons were described, based most commonly on a scintillation counter although there are imaging devices that use either gas filled ionization detectors or semiconductors. Whatever device is used, nuclear medicine images are produced from a very limited number of photons, due mainly to the level of radioactivity that can be safely injected into a patient. Hence, nuclear medicine images are usually made from many orders of magnitude fewer photons than X ray computed tomography (CT) images, for example. However, as the information produced is essentially functional in nature compared to the anatomical detail of CT, the apparently poorer image quality is overcome by the nature of the information produced. The low levels of photons detected in nuclear medicine means that photon counting can be performed. Here each photon is detected and analysed individually, which is especially valuable, for example, in enabling scattered photons to be rejected. This is in contrast to X ray imaging where images are produced by integrating the flux entering the detectors. Photon counting, however,  More>>
Authors:
Ott, R. J.; [1]  Stephenson, R. [2] 
  1. Joint Department of Physics, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, Surrey (United Kingdom)
  2. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Dec 15, 2014
Product Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 16 figs.; Related Information: In: Nuclear Medicine Physics: A Handbook for Teachers and Students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Asia–Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (AFOMP), Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM), European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), Federation of African Medical Physics Organisations (FAMPO), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB)| by Bailey, D.L.; Humm, J.L.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Aswegen, A. van (eds.)| 766 p.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CAT SCANNING; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; IMAGES; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PATIENTS; RADIOACTIVITY; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; SCINTILLATION COUNTERS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; SIGNALS
OSTI ID:
22327858
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-143810-2; TRN: XA15M0087034085
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1617web-1294055.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 214-233
Announcement Date:
May 02, 2015

Citation Formats

Ott, R. J., and Stephenson, R. Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Ott, R. J., & Stephenson, R. Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7. IAEA.
Ott, R. J., and Stephenson, R. 2014. "Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22327858,
title = {Electronics Related to Nuclear Medicine Imaging Devices. Chapter 7}
author = {Ott, R. J., and Stephenson, R.}
abstractNote = {Nuclear medicine imaging is generally based on the detection of X rays and γ rays emitted by radionuclides injected into a patient. In the previous chapter, the methods used to detect these photons were described, based most commonly on a scintillation counter although there are imaging devices that use either gas filled ionization detectors or semiconductors. Whatever device is used, nuclear medicine images are produced from a very limited number of photons, due mainly to the level of radioactivity that can be safely injected into a patient. Hence, nuclear medicine images are usually made from many orders of magnitude fewer photons than X ray computed tomography (CT) images, for example. However, as the information produced is essentially functional in nature compared to the anatomical detail of CT, the apparently poorer image quality is overcome by the nature of the information produced. The low levels of photons detected in nuclear medicine means that photon counting can be performed. Here each photon is detected and analysed individually, which is especially valuable, for example, in enabling scattered photons to be rejected. This is in contrast to X ray imaging where images are produced by integrating the flux entering the detectors. Photon counting, however, places a heavy burden on the electronics used for nuclear medicine imaging in terms of electronic noise and stability. This chapter will discuss how the signals produced in the primary photon detection process can be converted into pulses providing spatial, energy and timing information, and how this information is used to produce both qualitative and quantitative images.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Dec}
}