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Evolution of sociality, diet, and craniodental anatomy in the subfamly caninae; Evolucion de la socialidad, estrategias alimentarias y anatomia craneodental en la subfamilia caninae

Journal Article:

Abstract

Social carnivores affect population parameters, ecology, behavior and speciation and extinction rates of their prey and other sympatric carnivores. Therefore, social carnivores may have influenced the evolution of the structure and organization of ancestral and modern mammal communities. Thus, it is important to identify what extinct carnivore species may have been social and to determine when, where and under which environmental contexts they evolved. The first step is to establish if there is an association between morphological traits, susceptible of being preserved in the fossil record, and differences in the degree of sociality of present day carnivores. The aim of this research was to establish if there is an association between variation in shape and variables related to mechanical properties of the skulls, and differences in sociality level, diet and sex in modern canids. The sample included 972 specimens of 33 canid species. We analyzed the shape of the lateral side of the cranium, zygomatic arch, dentary bone and mandibular corpus, as well as 20 variables related to mechanical properties of the skull. Results suggest that hypercarnivorous social canids have shapes and mechanical properties that are different from other modern canids. We found that morphological variation is not affected by  More>>
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2012
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Acta Biologica Colombiana; Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 1
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANIMALS; ATTITUDES; BEHAVIOR; BIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION; BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION; CEREBRAL CORTEX; ECOLOGY; ENVIRONMENT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; MAMMALS; VERTEBRATES; WILD ANIMALS
OSTI ID:
22326033
Country of Origin:
Colombia
Language:
Spanish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0120-548X; TRN: CO1500024032249
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 173-200
Announcement Date:
Apr 30, 2015

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Munoz Duran, Joao, and Arturo Fuentes, Jesualdo. Evolution of sociality, diet, and craniodental anatomy in the subfamly caninae; Evolucion de la socialidad, estrategias alimentarias y anatomia craneodental en la subfamilia caninae. Colombia: N. p., 2012. Web.
Munoz Duran, Joao, & Arturo Fuentes, Jesualdo. Evolution of sociality, diet, and craniodental anatomy in the subfamly caninae; Evolucion de la socialidad, estrategias alimentarias y anatomia craneodental en la subfamilia caninae. Colombia.
Munoz Duran, Joao, and Arturo Fuentes, Jesualdo. 2012. "Evolution of sociality, diet, and craniodental anatomy in the subfamly caninae; Evolucion de la socialidad, estrategias alimentarias y anatomia craneodental en la subfamilia caninae." Colombia.
@misc{etde_22326033,
title = {Evolution of sociality, diet, and craniodental anatomy in the subfamly caninae; Evolucion de la socialidad, estrategias alimentarias y anatomia craneodental en la subfamilia caninae}
author = {Munoz Duran, Joao, and Arturo Fuentes, Jesualdo}
abstractNote = {Social carnivores affect population parameters, ecology, behavior and speciation and extinction rates of their prey and other sympatric carnivores. Therefore, social carnivores may have influenced the evolution of the structure and organization of ancestral and modern mammal communities. Thus, it is important to identify what extinct carnivore species may have been social and to determine when, where and under which environmental contexts they evolved. The first step is to establish if there is an association between morphological traits, susceptible of being preserved in the fossil record, and differences in the degree of sociality of present day carnivores. The aim of this research was to establish if there is an association between variation in shape and variables related to mechanical properties of the skulls, and differences in sociality level, diet and sex in modern canids. The sample included 972 specimens of 33 canid species. We analyzed the shape of the lateral side of the cranium, zygomatic arch, dentary bone and mandibular corpus, as well as 20 variables related to mechanical properties of the skull. Results suggest that hypercarnivorous social canids have shapes and mechanical properties that are different from other modern canids. We found that morphological variation is not affected by sex. Results may be used to identify extinct caninae species that were social and hypercarnivorous. Results also suggest that the evolution of sociality is dependent on phylogenetic relationships and ecological context, particularly the abundance of large prey and the presence of sympatric carnivores.}
journal = {Acta Biologica Colombiana}
issue = {1}
volume = {17}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Colombia}
year = {2012}
month = {Jul}
}