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Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs

Journal Article:

Abstract

Using an autogenous bone graft (obtained from the iliac crest), 4-mm cancellous bone screws, and polymethylmethacrylate, a distracted cervical spinal fusion technique was performed on 10 dogs with myelographic evidence of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. All dogs had evidence of dynamic soft tissue spinal cord compression, as indicated by flexion, extension, and traction myelographic views. Of the 10 dogs, 4 previously had undergone surgery by use of ventral slot or cervical disk fenestration techniques, and their neurologic status had deteriorated after the original surgery. Preoperative neurologic status of the 10 dogs included nonambulatory tetraparesis (n = 5), severe ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 2), and mild ambulatory ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 3). Five dogs had signs of various degrees of cervical pain. Clinical improvement was observed in 8 of 10 dogs--either improved neurologic status or elimination of cervical pain. Implant loosening developed in 3 dogs; 2 of them were euthanatized because of lack of neurologic improvement. Radiographic evidence of bony cervical fusion was observed during a 9- to 24-week period in 6 of the 8 surviving dogs. The distracted cervical fusion technique appears to be a valid surgical procedure to manage cervical spondylomyelopathy in those dogs  More>>
Publication Date:
Aug 15, 1988
Product Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association; Journal Volume: 193; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: FAO/AGRIS record; ARN: US8858975; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARTILAGE; DOGS; GRAFTS; MALFORMATIONS; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PAIN; SPINAL CORD; SURGERY; VERTEBRAE
OSTI ID:
22288987
Country of Origin:
FAO
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-1488; TRN: XF14B5550110429
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 447-453
Announcement Date:
Dec 19, 2014

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Ellison, G. W., Seim, III, H. B., and Clemmons, R. M. Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs. FAO: N. p., 1988. Web.
Ellison, G. W., Seim, III, H. B., & Clemmons, R. M. Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs. FAO.
Ellison, G. W., Seim, III, H. B., and Clemmons, R. M. 1988. "Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs." FAO.
@misc{etde_22288987,
title = {Distracted cervical spinal fusion for management of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy in large-breed dogs}
author = {Ellison, G. W., Seim, III, H. B., and Clemmons, R. M.}
abstractNote = {Using an autogenous bone graft (obtained from the iliac crest), 4-mm cancellous bone screws, and polymethylmethacrylate, a distracted cervical spinal fusion technique was performed on 10 dogs with myelographic evidence of caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy. All dogs had evidence of dynamic soft tissue spinal cord compression, as indicated by flexion, extension, and traction myelographic views. Of the 10 dogs, 4 previously had undergone surgery by use of ventral slot or cervical disk fenestration techniques, and their neurologic status had deteriorated after the original surgery. Preoperative neurologic status of the 10 dogs included nonambulatory tetraparesis (n = 5), severe ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 2), and mild ambulatory ataxia with conscious proprioceptive deficits (n = 3). Five dogs had signs of various degrees of cervical pain. Clinical improvement was observed in 8 of 10 dogs--either improved neurologic status or elimination of cervical pain. Implant loosening developed in 3 dogs; 2 of them were euthanatized because of lack of neurologic improvement. Radiographic evidence of bony cervical fusion was observed during a 9- to 24-week period in 6 of the 8 surviving dogs. The distracted cervical fusion technique appears to be a valid surgical procedure to manage cervical spondylomyelopathy in those dogs in which the lesions are limited to one cervical intervertebral disk space.}
journal = {Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association}
issue = {4}
volume = {193}
journal type = {AC}
place = {FAO}
year = {1988}
month = {Aug}
}