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Soils Newsletter, Vol. 37, No. 1, July 2014

Abstract

With increasing concern for the impacts of climate change and extreme weather events on the fragility of food production systems, food security and the natural resource base, there is an urgent need to enhance soil resilience to erosion, salinization, droughts, floods, and changes in soil and air temperature. By 2050, the world population will reach nine billion people, compared with the present number of nearly seven billion. The greatest challenge we face, is to meet the food demand associated with this increase in population growth without degrading the natural resource base and at the same time, minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which contribute to climate change. Integrated management of soil and water resources can make a positive difference, not only towards food security and sustainable agriculture but also to sustainable development (SD), since SD as defined by the United Nations, encompasses the importance of soil and water management for food security and poverty alleviation. Isotopic and nuclear techniques play an important role in assessing the impacts of climate change and variability on the natural resource base and evaluating different soil and water management practices on soil fertility, water use efficiency and land productivity for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Some  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2014
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-XA-14K0120
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Ref., figs., photos
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; CLIMATIC CHANGE; EARTH PLANET; FAO; FOOD; HUMAN POPULATIONS; IAEA; MANAGEMENT; SECURITY; SOILS; WATER
OSTI ID:
22264917
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Section, Vienna (Austria); FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1011-2650; TRN: XA14K0120086147
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Newsletters/SNL-37-1.pdf; Web sites: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/nafa/index.html; http://www.fao.org/ag/portal/index_en.html
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
40 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Sep 19, 2014

Citation Formats

Soils Newsletter, Vol. 37, No. 1, July 2014. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Soils Newsletter, Vol. 37, No. 1, July 2014. IAEA.
2014. "Soils Newsletter, Vol. 37, No. 1, July 2014." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22264917,
title = {Soils Newsletter, Vol. 37, No. 1, July 2014}
abstractNote = {With increasing concern for the impacts of climate change and extreme weather events on the fragility of food production systems, food security and the natural resource base, there is an urgent need to enhance soil resilience to erosion, salinization, droughts, floods, and changes in soil and air temperature. By 2050, the world population will reach nine billion people, compared with the present number of nearly seven billion. The greatest challenge we face, is to meet the food demand associated with this increase in population growth without degrading the natural resource base and at the same time, minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, which contribute to climate change. Integrated management of soil and water resources can make a positive difference, not only towards food security and sustainable agriculture but also to sustainable development (SD), since SD as defined by the United Nations, encompasses the importance of soil and water management for food security and poverty alleviation. Isotopic and nuclear techniques play an important role in assessing the impacts of climate change and variability on the natural resource base and evaluating different soil and water management practices on soil fertility, water use efficiency and land productivity for climate change adaptation and mitigation. Some of these aspects will be discussed in detail in one of the feature articles in this Soils Newsletter. More information on the use of isotopic and nuclear techniques in soil and water management can be seen in the FAO/IAEA Proceedings on Managing Soils for Food Security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation which will be published this year. This publication is a compilation of selected papers presented at the International Symposium organized by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division from 23-27 July 2012.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Jul}
}