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Promoting Intercultural Competencies

Abstract

What is culture? • Culture is the acquired knowledge people use to interpret experience and generate behavior. • It is the way of life a people pass down from one generation to the next through learning. • It is the rules for living and functioning in society that come from growing up in a specific society, and it is a set of acquired skills, habits and society-specific training that gives a group of people its identity. What is intercultural competency? • Cultures can have widely varying perspectives. • These perspectives influence the way that a person develops relationships, responds to situations, and operates in a professional setting. • Intercultural competency is the ability to comprehend and navigate the ways that culture can influence behavior, relationships, and the results of collaboration and interaction. What does becoming interculturally competent entail? • Intercultural preparedness is not merely travelling, learning a foreign language, or being exposed to other cultures. • Developing competency requires thinking about the challenges posed to our work by a multi-cultural workforce in a way that prepares employees and staff for potential incidents or misunderstandings. • It is impossible to avoid all intercultural misunderstandings, but learning to anticipate them and deal  More>>
Authors:
Bachner, Katherine M., E-mail: kbachner@bnl.gov [1] 
  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2014
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-CN-215
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity, Vienna (Austria), 12-16 May 2014; Other Information: PowerPoint presentation; Related Information: In: International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity. Presentations| vp.
Subject:
96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION; BEHAVIOR; HUMAN FACTORS; KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT; LEARNING; PERSONNEL; SAFETY CULTURE; TRAINING
OSTI ID:
22255434
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Nuclear Power, Nuclear Power Engineering Section and Safety and Security Coordination Section, Programme and Policy Unit, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA14M3838076628
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/iaeameetings/cn215p/Thursday/IAPs/Afternoon/Bachner.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
11 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Aug 07, 2014

Citation Formats

Bachner, Katherine M., E-mail: kbachner@bnl.gov. Promoting Intercultural Competencies. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Bachner, Katherine M., E-mail: kbachner@bnl.gov. Promoting Intercultural Competencies. IAEA.
Bachner, Katherine M., E-mail: kbachner@bnl.gov. 2014. "Promoting Intercultural Competencies." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22255434,
title = {Promoting Intercultural Competencies}
author = {Bachner, Katherine M., E-mail: kbachner@bnl.gov}
abstractNote = {What is culture? • Culture is the acquired knowledge people use to interpret experience and generate behavior. • It is the way of life a people pass down from one generation to the next through learning. • It is the rules for living and functioning in society that come from growing up in a specific society, and it is a set of acquired skills, habits and society-specific training that gives a group of people its identity. What is intercultural competency? • Cultures can have widely varying perspectives. • These perspectives influence the way that a person develops relationships, responds to situations, and operates in a professional setting. • Intercultural competency is the ability to comprehend and navigate the ways that culture can influence behavior, relationships, and the results of collaboration and interaction. What does becoming interculturally competent entail? • Intercultural preparedness is not merely travelling, learning a foreign language, or being exposed to other cultures. • Developing competency requires thinking about the challenges posed to our work by a multi-cultural workforce in a way that prepares employees and staff for potential incidents or misunderstandings. • It is impossible to avoid all intercultural misunderstandings, but learning to anticipate them and deal with them is key to developing any training program on culture.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Jul}
}