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Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources

Abstract

Over the past few decades, the global scrap metal industry has grown increasingly vigilant regarding radioactive contamination. Accidental melts of radioactive sources in some smelting facilities, in particular, have caused considerable damage and required recovery efforts costing tens of millions of dollars. In response, the industry has developed and deployed countermeasures. Increasingly expensive and sophisticated radiation monitoring devices have been implemented at key scrap entry points - ports and scrapyards. Recognition of the importance of such endeavors has led to a series of activities aimed at establishing organized and coordinated efforts among the interested parties. Recent concerns over the potential use of radioactive sources for radiological devices in terrorist acts have substantially heightened the need for national and international authorities to further control, intercept, and secure the sources that have escaped the regulatory domain. Enhanced collaboration by the government and industry could substantially improve the effectiveness of efforts at control; the 'Spanish Protocol' as developed by the Spanish metal industry and government regulators is a good example of such collaboration. (author)
Authors:
Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov [1] 
  1. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2011
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Conference on Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal, Tarragona (Spain), 23-27 Feb 2009; Other Information: 17 refs.; Related Information: In: Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference| 406 p.
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; MATERIALS RECOVERY; METAL INDUSTRY; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIATION SOURCES; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; SCRAP METALS; SPAIN
OSTI ID:
22212950
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Spanish Nuclear Safety Council, Tarragona (Spain)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; ISBN 978-92-0-114910-7; TRN: XA14K0622033907
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1502_web.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 183-189
Announcement Date:
Apr 03, 2014

Citation Formats

Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov. Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources. IAEA: N. p., 2011. Web.
Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov. Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources. IAEA.
Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov. 2011. "Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22212950,
title = {Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources}
author = {Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov}
abstractNote = {Over the past few decades, the global scrap metal industry has grown increasingly vigilant regarding radioactive contamination. Accidental melts of radioactive sources in some smelting facilities, in particular, have caused considerable damage and required recovery efforts costing tens of millions of dollars. In response, the industry has developed and deployed countermeasures. Increasingly expensive and sophisticated radiation monitoring devices have been implemented at key scrap entry points - ports and scrapyards. Recognition of the importance of such endeavors has led to a series of activities aimed at establishing organized and coordinated efforts among the interested parties. Recent concerns over the potential use of radioactive sources for radiological devices in terrorist acts have substantially heightened the need for national and international authorities to further control, intercept, and secure the sources that have escaped the regulatory domain. Enhanced collaboration by the government and industry could substantially improve the effectiveness of efforts at control; the 'Spanish Protocol' as developed by the Spanish metal industry and government regulators is a good example of such collaboration. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2011}
month = {Jul}
}