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The Relevance of Metal Recycling for Nuclear Industry Decommissioning Programmes

Abstract

The large amount of scrap metal arising from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities may present significant problems in the event that the facility owners seek to implement a management strategy based largely or fully on disposal in dedicated disposal facilities. Depending on whether disposal facilities currently exist or need to be developed, this option can be very expensive. Also, public reluctance to accept the expansion of existing disposal facilities, or the siting of new ones, mean that the disposal option should be used only after a wide consideration of all available management options. A comparison of health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of the recycling of lightly contaminated scrap metal, as compared with equivalent impacts associated with the production of replacement material, suggests that recycling has significant overall advantages. With present-day technologies, a large proportion of the metal waste from decommissioning can be decontaminated to clearance levels because most of the contamination is on or near the surface of the metal. In purely economic terms, it makes little sense for lightly contaminated scrap metal from decommissioning, which tends to be of high quality, to be removed from the supply chain and replaced with metal from newly-mined ore. In many countries, the  More>>
Authors:
O'Sullivan, P.J., E-mail: nea@nea.fr [1] 
  1. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2011
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Conference on Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal, Tarragona (Spain), 23-27 Feb 2009; Other Information: 5 tabs., 11 refs.; Related Information: In: Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference| 406 p.
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; CLEARANCE; CONTAMINATION; DECOMMISSIONING; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; MELTING; MINES; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; NUCLEAR INDUSTRY; ORES; RECYCLING; SCRAP METALS; SWEDEN
OSTI ID:
22212937
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Spanish Nuclear Safety Council, Tarragona (Spain)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; ISBN 978-92-0-114910-7; TRN: XA14K0609033894
Availability:
Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1502_web.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 31-43
Announcement Date:
Apr 03, 2014

Citation Formats

O'Sullivan, P.J., E-mail: nea@nea.fr. The Relevance of Metal Recycling for Nuclear Industry Decommissioning Programmes. IAEA: N. p., 2011. Web.
O'Sullivan, P.J., E-mail: nea@nea.fr. The Relevance of Metal Recycling for Nuclear Industry Decommissioning Programmes. IAEA.
O'Sullivan, P.J., E-mail: nea@nea.fr. 2011. "The Relevance of Metal Recycling for Nuclear Industry Decommissioning Programmes." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22212937,
title = {The Relevance of Metal Recycling for Nuclear Industry Decommissioning Programmes}
author = {O'Sullivan, P.J., E-mail: nea@nea.fr}
abstractNote = {The large amount of scrap metal arising from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities may present significant problems in the event that the facility owners seek to implement a management strategy based largely or fully on disposal in dedicated disposal facilities. Depending on whether disposal facilities currently exist or need to be developed, this option can be very expensive. Also, public reluctance to accept the expansion of existing disposal facilities, or the siting of new ones, mean that the disposal option should be used only after a wide consideration of all available management options. A comparison of health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of the recycling of lightly contaminated scrap metal, as compared with equivalent impacts associated with the production of replacement material, suggests that recycling has significant overall advantages. With present-day technologies, a large proportion of the metal waste from decommissioning can be decontaminated to clearance levels because most of the contamination is on or near the surface of the metal. In purely economic terms, it makes little sense for lightly contaminated scrap metal from decommissioning, which tends to be of high quality, to be removed from the supply chain and replaced with metal from newly-mined ore. In many countries, the metal recycling industry remains reluctant to accept metal from decommissioning. In Germany, the recycling industry and the decommissioning industry have worked together to develop an approach whereby such material is accepted for melting and the recycled material and is then used for certain defined end uses. Sweden also uses dedicated melting facilities for the recycling of metal from the nuclear industry. Following this approach, the needs of the decommissioning industry are being met in a way that also addresses the needs of the recycling industry. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2011}
month = {Jul}
}