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Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay

Conference:

Abstract

Sensitive immunoassay methods should be applied to small molecules of biological importance, which are non-immunogenic by themselves, such as small peptide hormones (e.g. bradykinin), plant hormones (e.g. indoleacetic acid), nucleotides and other small molecules. Methods of binding these small molecules, as haptens, to immunogenic carriers by various cross-linking agents are described (dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, tolylene-diisocyanate and glutaraldehyde), and the considerations involved in relation to the methods of binding and the specificity of the antibodies formed are discussed. Some uses of antibody bound to bromoacetyl cellulose as an immuno adsorbent convenient for assay of immunoglobulins are described. Finally, the sensitive immunoassay method of chemically modified phage is described. This includes methods of binding small molecules (such as the dinitrophenyl group, penicillin, indoleacetic acid) or proteins (such as insulin, immunoglobulins) to phages. Methods of direct chemical conjugation, or an indirect binding via anti-phage Fab, are described. The phage inactivation method by direct plating and its modifications (such as decision technique and complex inactivation) are compared with the more simple end-point titration method. The inhibition of phage inactivation has some advantages as it does not require radioactive material, or expensive radioactive counters, and avoids the need for separation between bound and unbound antigen. Hence, if  More>>
Authors:
Givol, D. [1] 
  1. Department of Chemical Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)
Publication Date:
Feb 15, 1970
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-124/72
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on In Vitro Procedures with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research, Vienna (Austria), 8-12 Sep 1969; Other Information: 27 refs., 10 figs.; Related Information: In: In Vitro Procedures with Radioisotopes in Medicine. Proceedings of the Symposium on In Vitro Procedures with Radioistopes in Clinical Medicine and Research| 736 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADSORBENTS; ANTIBODIES; ANTIGENS; BACTERIOPHAGES; BRADYKININ; CARRIERS; CROSS-LINKING; IMMUNOGLOBULINS; INACTIVATION; INHIBITION; INSULIN; MOLECULES; NUCLEOTIDES; PENICILLIN; RADIOIMMUNOASSAY; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; TITRATION
OSTI ID:
22205131
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M4212026043
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 515-524
Announcement Date:
Mar 17, 2014

Conference:

Citation Formats

Givol, D. Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay. IAEA: N. p., 1970. Web.
Givol, D. Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay. IAEA.
Givol, D. 1970. "Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22205131,
title = {Procedures for Sensitive Immunoassay}
author = {Givol, D.}
abstractNote = {Sensitive immunoassay methods should be applied to small molecules of biological importance, which are non-immunogenic by themselves, such as small peptide hormones (e.g. bradykinin), plant hormones (e.g. indoleacetic acid), nucleotides and other small molecules. Methods of binding these small molecules, as haptens, to immunogenic carriers by various cross-linking agents are described (dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, tolylene-diisocyanate and glutaraldehyde), and the considerations involved in relation to the methods of binding and the specificity of the antibodies formed are discussed. Some uses of antibody bound to bromoacetyl cellulose as an immuno adsorbent convenient for assay of immunoglobulins are described. Finally, the sensitive immunoassay method of chemically modified phage is described. This includes methods of binding small molecules (such as the dinitrophenyl group, penicillin, indoleacetic acid) or proteins (such as insulin, immunoglobulins) to phages. Methods of direct chemical conjugation, or an indirect binding via anti-phage Fab, are described. The phage inactivation method by direct plating and its modifications (such as decision technique and complex inactivation) are compared with the more simple end-point titration method. The inhibition of phage inactivation has some advantages as it does not require radioactive material, or expensive radioactive counters, and avoids the need for separation between bound and unbound antigen. Hence, if developed, it could be used as an alternative to radioimmunoassay. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1970}
month = {Feb}
}