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Can Experimental Scientists, Data Evaluators and Compilers, and Nuclear Data Users Understand One Another?

Abstract

The International Atomic Energy Agency organizes conferences on a wide variety of scientific subjects, all of which are of fundamental importance for the development of nuclear power. These include the technology of fuel elements, their stability in neutron fields, and chemical reprocessing as well as reactor physics, mathematical computational methods and the problems of protection and dosimetry. The problem of microscopic nuclear data, an essential aspect of reactor work, is just one of these many subjects. On the other hand, it should be remembered that the possibility of releasing nuclear energy was established in the first place by obtaining nuclear data on the fission process occurring in the uranium nucleus following the capture of a neutron and on the escape of the 2-3 secondary fission neutrons. In early nuclear power work the information provided by nuclear data was of considerable, even of decisive, importance. For example, the information available on the neutron balance in fast reactors showed that such reactors could operate as breeders and thus that it was worth while developing them. Strictly speaking, it is of course difficult to speak of a knowledge of nuclear data at this early period. It is perhaps more accurate to speak of  More>>
Authors:
Usachev, L. N. [1] 
  1. Institute of Physics and Energetics, Obninsk, USSR (Russian Federation)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1966
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INDC-166; INDC(IAE)-33/U
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Translated from Russian; 1 fig., 13 refs.
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; BALANCES; FAST REACTORS; FISSION; FISSION NEUTRONS; FUEL ELEMENTS; IAEA; MEETINGS; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; NUCLEAR DATA COLLECTIONS; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR POWER; NUCLEI; RADIATION PROTECTION; REACTOR PHYSICS; REPROCESSING; URANIUM
OSTI ID:
22192705
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, International Nuclear Data Committee, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA13R1211017194
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: https://www-nds.iaea.org/publications/indc/indc-iae-asterisk33U.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
11 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Feb 20, 2014

Citation Formats

Usachev, L. N. Can Experimental Scientists, Data Evaluators and Compilers, and Nuclear Data Users Understand One Another?. IAEA: N. p., 1966. Web.
Usachev, L. N. Can Experimental Scientists, Data Evaluators and Compilers, and Nuclear Data Users Understand One Another?. IAEA.
Usachev, L. N. 1966. "Can Experimental Scientists, Data Evaluators and Compilers, and Nuclear Data Users Understand One Another?" IAEA.
@misc{etde_22192705,
title = {Can Experimental Scientists, Data Evaluators and Compilers, and Nuclear Data Users Understand One Another?}
author = {Usachev, L. N.}
abstractNote = {The International Atomic Energy Agency organizes conferences on a wide variety of scientific subjects, all of which are of fundamental importance for the development of nuclear power. These include the technology of fuel elements, their stability in neutron fields, and chemical reprocessing as well as reactor physics, mathematical computational methods and the problems of protection and dosimetry. The problem of microscopic nuclear data, an essential aspect of reactor work, is just one of these many subjects. On the other hand, it should be remembered that the possibility of releasing nuclear energy was established in the first place by obtaining nuclear data on the fission process occurring in the uranium nucleus following the capture of a neutron and on the escape of the 2-3 secondary fission neutrons. In early nuclear power work the information provided by nuclear data was of considerable, even of decisive, importance. For example, the information available on the neutron balance in fast reactors showed that such reactors could operate as breeders and thus that it was worth while developing them. Strictly speaking, it is of course difficult to speak of a knowledge of nuclear data at this early period. It is perhaps more accurate to speak of the understanding of and the feeling for such data which grew up on the basis of the existing physical ideas on the fission of the nucleus, radiative capture and neutron scattering. Experimental data were very scanty but for that reason they were particularly valuable.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1966}
month = {Jul}
}