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Evaluation and Selection of Maize (Zea Mays L.) Genotypes Tolerant to Low N Soil

Abstract

The identification and/or the development of germplasm with traits which enhance N uptake and N use efficiency in low N soil could significantly sustain maize production on stress environments. The use of secondary traits highly correlated with grain yield and high heritability, could speed up the development of genotypes adapted to low N environments. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are known to enhance P uptake, but its role on plant N nutrition has not been extensively studied. The study aimed to (i) identify tolerant and/or low N responsive genotypes (ii) measure the correlated response of grain yield with some agronomic plant characteristic under low N and under mycorrhiza inoculation (iii) measure the combining ability and the gene effects of the lines under low and high N and (iv) to identify stable and high yielding hybrids adapted to low and high N condition. Initial screening of 99 genotypes for two years identified 30 inbred lines that were evaluated in split plots for: grain yield, root volume, chlorophyll content, leaf area index, and mycorrhizal colonization. Significant genotype x soil N level interactions were obtained among the tested inbreds for all measured traits, except for chlorophyll content which exhibited similar ranking from one soil N  More>>
Authors:
The, C.; [1]  Ngonkeu, M. L.; Zonkeng, C.; Apala, H. M. [2] 
  1. West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI), Legon, Accra (Ghana)
  2. Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD), Yaounde (Cameroon)
Publication Date:
Nov 15, 2013
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
IAEA-TECDOC-1721
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 2 figs., 11 tabs., 13 refs.; Related Information: In: Optimizing Productivity of Food Crop Genotypes in Low Nutrient Soils| 342 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CHLOROPHYLL; EFFICIENCY; FUNGI; GENES; GENOTYPE; HYBRIDIZATION; LEAVES; MAIZE; PLANT BREEDING; ROOTS; SOILS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; UPTAKE
OSTI ID:
22192689
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Section, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 978-92-0-113113-3; ISSN 1011-4289; TRN: XA14R0172017178
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/TE-1721_web.pdf; Enquiries should be addressed to IAEA, Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, E-mail: sales.publications@iaea.org; Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 251-264
Announcement Date:
Feb 20, 2014

Citation Formats

The, C., Ngonkeu, M. L., Zonkeng, C., and Apala, H. M. Evaluation and Selection of Maize (Zea Mays L.) Genotypes Tolerant to Low N Soil. IAEA: N. p., 2013. Web.
The, C., Ngonkeu, M. L., Zonkeng, C., & Apala, H. M. Evaluation and Selection of Maize (Zea Mays L.) Genotypes Tolerant to Low N Soil. IAEA.
The, C., Ngonkeu, M. L., Zonkeng, C., and Apala, H. M. 2013. "Evaluation and Selection of Maize (Zea Mays L.) Genotypes Tolerant to Low N Soil." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22192689,
title = {Evaluation and Selection of Maize (Zea Mays L.) Genotypes Tolerant to Low N Soil}
author = {The, C., Ngonkeu, M. L., Zonkeng, C., and Apala, H. M.}
abstractNote = {The identification and/or the development of germplasm with traits which enhance N uptake and N use efficiency in low N soil could significantly sustain maize production on stress environments. The use of secondary traits highly correlated with grain yield and high heritability, could speed up the development of genotypes adapted to low N environments. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi are known to enhance P uptake, but its role on plant N nutrition has not been extensively studied. The study aimed to (i) identify tolerant and/or low N responsive genotypes (ii) measure the correlated response of grain yield with some agronomic plant characteristic under low N and under mycorrhiza inoculation (iii) measure the combining ability and the gene effects of the lines under low and high N and (iv) to identify stable and high yielding hybrids adapted to low and high N condition. Initial screening of 99 genotypes for two years identified 30 inbred lines that were evaluated in split plots for: grain yield, root volume, chlorophyll content, leaf area index, and mycorrhizal colonization. Significant genotype x soil N level interactions were obtained among the tested inbreds for all measured traits, except for chlorophyll content which exhibited similar ranking from one soil N level to another. In addition to selection for grain yield, 5 lines were retained for their good root volume, 4 for their chlorophyll content and stay green traits, 3 for their leaf area index and the last 3 for their mycorrhizal colonization. Diallel crosses among the 15 selected lines yielded 105 F1 hybrids evaluated in split plots, with 3 soil treatment levels (20 kg-N ha{sup -1}, 20 kg-N ha{sup -1} + mycorrhiza and 100 kg-N h{sup a-1}). Significant differences were detected among the 3 soil treatments as well as for genotypes x soil interaction for all measured traits. On 20 N plots, 10 hybrids yielded at least as good as the check hybrid: Expl{sub 24} x 87036 (3.0 t ha{sup -1}). Among the 20 parents involved in these crosses, 8 had been retained for their chlorophyll content, six for their root volume, four for their leaf area index and two for their mycorrhizal colonization. On plots with 20 N, in addition to mycorrhizal inoculation, 8 hybrids yielded more than the check (3.2 t ha{sup -1}). Among the 16 inbreds involved, 5 were retained for their root volume, 4 for their mycorrhizal colonization and leaf area index, respectively, and 3 for their chlorophyll content. On 100 N plots, 13 hybrids yielded more than the check (5.4 t ha{sup -1}). Among the 26 inbreds involved, 13 (50%) were selected for their root volume, six (25%) for their mycorrhizal colonization, four (15.4%) for their leaf area index, and three (11.5%) for high chlorophyll content. It was concluded that on low N soil, selection for root volume was correlated with grain yield. However, maximum benefit was obtained in hybrids when their inbred parents exhibited complementary plant characteristics such as the efficient colonization by mycorrhiza, good leaf area index and high chlorophyll content. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2013}
month = {Nov}
}