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Secondary Disease in Radiation Chimeras

Conference:

Abstract

A review of research dealing directly or indirectly with the development of bidirectional tolerance in radiation chimeras has been made, emphasizing some of the contemporary research on this subject in Oak Ridge and Knoxville. By controlling such factors as cell dose, age of donor animal and day of cell injection, it was possible to achieve bidirectional tolerance. Attempts to reduce bidirectional tolerance in favour of increasing the graft-versus-host reaction were less successful. Hypoxic caging demonstrated a new approach to achieving bidirectional tolerance through physiological competition for growth. Graft-versus-host reactions have a lower growth priority than marrow regeneration or erythropoietic hyperplasia. Study of pathologic processes, immunologic capability and the-biochemical lesions in radiation chimeras all lead to new ideas that involve bidirectional tolerance. The investigations on dose rate in radiation suppression of the immune response and on LD{sub 50} (30- to 90-day)values after injection of different numbers of marrow cells all have a bearing on control of the host-versus-graft response and therefore are important in understanding bidirectional tolerance. (author)
Authors:
Congdon, C. C. [1] 
  1. Biology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Panel on Current Problems of Bone-Marrow Cell Transplantation with Special Emphasis on Conservation and Culture, Moscow (Russian Federation), 22-26 Jul 1968; Other Information: 28 refs., 1 tab.; Related Information: In: Bone-Marrow Conservation, Culture and Transplantation. Proceedings of a Panel on Current Problems of Bone-Marrow Cell Transplantation with Special Emphasis on Conservation and Culture| 211 p.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BEARINGS; DISEASES; DOSE RATES; GRAFT-HOST REACTION; GRAFTS; INJECTION; RADIATION CHIMERAS; RADIOSTERILIZATION; REGENERATION; TOLERANCE; TRANSPLANTS
OSTI ID:
22192466
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA14M0703016955
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 21-27
Announcement Date:
Feb 20, 2014

Conference:

Citation Formats

Congdon, C. C. Secondary Disease in Radiation Chimeras. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Congdon, C. C. Secondary Disease in Radiation Chimeras. IAEA.
Congdon, C. C. 1969. "Secondary Disease in Radiation Chimeras." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22192466,
title = {Secondary Disease in Radiation Chimeras}
author = {Congdon, C. C.}
abstractNote = {A review of research dealing directly or indirectly with the development of bidirectional tolerance in radiation chimeras has been made, emphasizing some of the contemporary research on this subject in Oak Ridge and Knoxville. By controlling such factors as cell dose, age of donor animal and day of cell injection, it was possible to achieve bidirectional tolerance. Attempts to reduce bidirectional tolerance in favour of increasing the graft-versus-host reaction were less successful. Hypoxic caging demonstrated a new approach to achieving bidirectional tolerance through physiological competition for growth. Graft-versus-host reactions have a lower growth priority than marrow regeneration or erythropoietic hyperplasia. Study of pathologic processes, immunologic capability and the-biochemical lesions in radiation chimeras all lead to new ideas that involve bidirectional tolerance. The investigations on dose rate in radiation suppression of the immune response and on LD{sub 50} (30- to 90-day)values after injection of different numbers of marrow cells all have a bearing on control of the host-versus-graft response and therefore are important in understanding bidirectional tolerance. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Jul}
}