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Livestock Production - Current Status in South and South-East Asia, Future Directions and Priority Areas for Research

Abstract

The role of livestock in agriculture in South and South-East Asia is complex and significantly different from that of industrialized nations. The traditional farming systems are mostly based on mixed crop-livestock systems, with small farms predominating. The most important livestock species in the region are cattle (Bos indicus, Bos taurus and their crosses), buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, both river and swamp types), goats, sheep, pigs and poultry. In some high altitude areas Yaks (Poephagus grunniens) and Mithun or Gayal (Bos frontalis) are also important. Although the contribution of the livestock sub-sector to national GDP in most Asian countries is low, it is a crucial source of high quality protein, minerals and vitamins to the population, by way of milk, meat and eggs. For millions of smallholder farmers it provides food security, draught power, fibre, manure and fuel, and also serves as a 'living bank' in periods of economic hardship. The farming systems in the region vary widely (Perera et al., 2005), determined by a matrix of several interacting factors that include climate (latitude, altitude and rainfall), location (rural, peri-urban or urban), cropping systems (rain-fed or irrigated, annual or perennial crops), type of operation (small or large farm, subsistence or commercial), and  More>>
Authors:
Perera, B. M.A. Oswin, [1] 
  1. Kandy (Sri Lanka)
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 2014
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-XA-14R0177
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Refs.; Related Information: In: Animal Production and Health Newsletter, No. 59, January 2014| 44 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AGRICULTURE; ASIA; BUFFALO; CATTLE; CROPS; CULTIVATION TECHNIQUES; EGGS; FARMS; FOWL; GRAZING; GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT; MANURES; MEAT; MILK; PROTEINS; RANGELANDS; RIVERS; SWAMPS; SWINE
OSTI ID:
22190329
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Animal Production and Health Section, Vienna (Austria); FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1011-2529; TRN: XA14R0178014818
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Newsletters/APH-NL-59.pdf; Web sites: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/nafa/index.html; http://www.fao.org/ag/portal/index_en.html
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 5-8
Announcement Date:
Feb 13, 2014

Citation Formats

Perera, B. M.A. Oswin,. Livestock Production - Current Status in South and South-East Asia, Future Directions and Priority Areas for Research. IAEA: N. p., 2014. Web.
Perera, B. M.A. Oswin,. Livestock Production - Current Status in South and South-East Asia, Future Directions and Priority Areas for Research. IAEA.
Perera, B. M.A. Oswin,. 2014. "Livestock Production - Current Status in South and South-East Asia, Future Directions and Priority Areas for Research." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22190329,
title = {Livestock Production - Current Status in South and South-East Asia, Future Directions and Priority Areas for Research}
author = {Perera, B. M.A. Oswin,}
abstractNote = {The role of livestock in agriculture in South and South-East Asia is complex and significantly different from that of industrialized nations. The traditional farming systems are mostly based on mixed crop-livestock systems, with small farms predominating. The most important livestock species in the region are cattle (Bos indicus, Bos taurus and their crosses), buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, both river and swamp types), goats, sheep, pigs and poultry. In some high altitude areas Yaks (Poephagus grunniens) and Mithun or Gayal (Bos frontalis) are also important. Although the contribution of the livestock sub-sector to national GDP in most Asian countries is low, it is a crucial source of high quality protein, minerals and vitamins to the population, by way of milk, meat and eggs. For millions of smallholder farmers it provides food security, draught power, fibre, manure and fuel, and also serves as a 'living bank' in periods of economic hardship. The farming systems in the region vary widely (Perera et al., 2005), determined by a matrix of several interacting factors that include climate (latitude, altitude and rainfall), location (rural, peri-urban or urban), cropping systems (rain-fed or irrigated, annual or perennial crops), type of operation (small or large farm, subsistence or commercial), and the species and their primary purpose (milk, meat, eggs, draught, capital or mixed). The ruminant production systems that were largely extensive or semi-intensive in the past (grassland-based or mixed crop-livestock, with rain-fed or irrigated mixed farming), which were sustained with locally available resources, have become constrained due to many factors. Competition for land from the increasing human population that demands space for habitation, crop production and other economic activities have dwindled grazing lands. Mechanization of agricultural operations and commercial market forces have also made such systems less competitive. Thus some enterprising farmers have moved to more intensive systems of production based on livestock only or landless systems with high producing breeds that require greater external inputs for feed, labour and health care (Perera, 2010). The monogastric production systems for poultry and pigs that were traditionally backyard operations based on household refuse and crop by-products have given way to intensive commercial systems of varying scale, based on commercial breeds and bought-in feed.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2014}
month = {Jan}
}