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Cytokinetics and Regulation of Progenitor Cells

Conference:

Abstract

Full text: In spite of great differences in the life-span of fully differentiated haemic cells, the cellular kinetics of their production appears to be similar. Recent evidence indicates a common ultimate stem cell for most of the cells in the peripheral blood. The various pathways of differentiation, however, result in transient dividing and differentiating cell populations which differ from each other not only in their specific biochemical processes but also in the manner of control and kinetic pattern of their proliferation. The population best understood is the erythroid progenitor series of cells, primarily because it has the greatest number of experimentally measurable parameters at the present. This will be discussed in detail and comparisons will be made with the myeloid and lymphoid progenitor populations. The fine structure of the bone-marrow stem cell population will be examined in particular, with regard to the suitability or otherwise of the current stem cell models to explain the kinetic pattern of all the peripheral blood elements after perturbations of their steady-state values. Four different assay methods of bone-marrow stem cells have been examined with regard to the kinetic pattern following perturbation of the steady-state system, e.g. by irradiation. Basically, the stem cell assays fall  More>>
Authors:
Lajtha, L. G. [1] 
  1. Paterson Laboratories, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 1967
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Panel on the Effects of Various Types of Ionizing Radiations from Different Sources on Haematopoietic Tissue, Vienna (Austria), 17-20 May 1966; Related Information: In: Effects of Ionizing Radiations on the Haematopoietic Tissue. Proceedings of a Panel on the Effects of Various Types of Ionizing Radiations from Different Sources on Haematopoietic Tissue| 174 p.
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; BLOOD; BONE MARROW; CELL CYCLE; CELL PROLIFERATION; GRAFTS; IRRADIATION; LIFE SPAN; PERTURBATION THEORY; STEM CELLS
OSTI ID:
22190119
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: XA14M0638014604
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 3
Announcement Date:
Feb 13, 2014

Conference:

Citation Formats

Lajtha, L. G. Cytokinetics and Regulation of Progenitor Cells. IAEA: N. p., 1967. Web.
Lajtha, L. G. Cytokinetics and Regulation of Progenitor Cells. IAEA.
Lajtha, L. G. 1967. "Cytokinetics and Regulation of Progenitor Cells." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22190119,
title = {Cytokinetics and Regulation of Progenitor Cells}
author = {Lajtha, L. G.}
abstractNote = {Full text: In spite of great differences in the life-span of fully differentiated haemic cells, the cellular kinetics of their production appears to be similar. Recent evidence indicates a common ultimate stem cell for most of the cells in the peripheral blood. The various pathways of differentiation, however, result in transient dividing and differentiating cell populations which differ from each other not only in their specific biochemical processes but also in the manner of control and kinetic pattern of their proliferation. The population best understood is the erythroid progenitor series of cells, primarily because it has the greatest number of experimentally measurable parameters at the present. This will be discussed in detail and comparisons will be made with the myeloid and lymphoid progenitor populations. The fine structure of the bone-marrow stem cell population will be examined in particular, with regard to the suitability or otherwise of the current stem cell models to explain the kinetic pattern of all the peripheral blood elements after perturbations of their steady-state values. Four different assay methods of bone-marrow stem cells have been examined with regard to the kinetic pattern following perturbation of the steady-state system, e.g. by irradiation. Basically, the stem cell assays fall into two categories: those depending on grafting haemopoietic cells into suitably treated recipients, and those in which recovery of the population is allowed in the animal in which the perturbation was produced, without handling the cells. Evidence is accumulating which indicates that in the grafting techniques, a selective loss of stem cells may occur, . especially stem cells in cell cycle, hence in early stages of recovery of the population unduly low numerical values might be noted. In view of this observation, the concept of the colony-forming cell may have to be revised and instead the colony-forming property of the stem cell introduced. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1967}
month = {Jul}
}