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Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 81, July 2013

Abstract

In response to requests from our readers, this introduction is mainly dedicated to the ongoing efforts to develop alternatives for insect reproductive sterilization and blood sterilization for their use in insect pest control programmes with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component. Radioisotope irradiators that are loaded with either cobalt-60 or caesium-137 producing gamma rays have been routinely used for many decades and have proven to be extremely reliable and safe for these purposes in successful area-wide insect eradication or suppression programmes. These include industrial panoramic-type irradiators in larger programmes, all the way to smaller self-contained irradiators. Nevertheless, the transboundary shipment of self-contained gamma irradiators or radioactive material has become logistically more complex due to security issues. This situation was exacerbated when the production of the Gamma Cell 220 (GC220), the source most commonly used for irradiating insects for sterilization purposes, was discontinued. These events may have created the impression that the use of gamma radiation has become a less viable option, unattainable for insect pest control programmes that want to integrate the SIT. Nevertheless, some of the biggest SIT operational programmes have in recent years been equipped with new self-contained cobalt-60 sources, including the SIT programme against the pink bollworm  More>>
Authors:
"NONE"
Publication Date:
Jul 15, 2013
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
INIS-XA-14R0004
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 1 fig., photos
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ARIZONA; BLOOD; BOLLWORM; CERATITIS CAPITATA; CESIUM 137; COBALT 60; GAMMA RADIATION; GUATEMALA; PANAMA; PEST CONTROL; RADIOSTERILIZATION; STERILE INSECT RELEASE; STERILE MALE TECHNIQUE
OSTI ID:
22188299
Research Organizations:
Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Vienna (Austria); FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 1011-274X; TRN: XA14R0004012808
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on-line: http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Newsletters/IPC-NL-81.pdf; Web sites: http://www-naweb.iaea.org/nafa/ipc/index.html; http://www.fao.org/ag/portal/age-index/en/
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
44 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Feb 06, 2014

Citation Formats

Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 81, July 2013. IAEA: N. p., 2013. Web.
Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 81, July 2013. IAEA.
2013. "Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 81, July 2013." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22188299,
title = {Insect Pest Control Newsletter, No. 81, July 2013}
abstractNote = {In response to requests from our readers, this introduction is mainly dedicated to the ongoing efforts to develop alternatives for insect reproductive sterilization and blood sterilization for their use in insect pest control programmes with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component. Radioisotope irradiators that are loaded with either cobalt-60 or caesium-137 producing gamma rays have been routinely used for many decades and have proven to be extremely reliable and safe for these purposes in successful area-wide insect eradication or suppression programmes. These include industrial panoramic-type irradiators in larger programmes, all the way to smaller self-contained irradiators. Nevertheless, the transboundary shipment of self-contained gamma irradiators or radioactive material has become logistically more complex due to security issues. This situation was exacerbated when the production of the Gamma Cell 220 (GC220), the source most commonly used for irradiating insects for sterilization purposes, was discontinued. These events may have created the impression that the use of gamma radiation has become a less viable option, unattainable for insect pest control programmes that want to integrate the SIT. Nevertheless, some of the biggest SIT operational programmes have in recent years been equipped with new self-contained cobalt-60 sources, including the SIT programme against the pink bollworm in Phoenix, Arizona; El Pino Mediterranean fruit fly facility in Guatemala; and the screwworm programme in Panama. Thus these larger and more expensive irradiators, together with panoramic units (that are also costlier than self-contained gamma irradiators) have remained over the years a valid option, especially for larger operational programmes. In addition, the reloading of smaller units with new cobalt or the purchase of refurbished used self-contained irradiators remain viable alternatives.}
place = {IAEA}
year = {2013}
month = {Jul}
}