You need JavaScript to view this

Radiobiological Parameters in Human Cancers Attributable to Long-Term Radium Deposition

Conference:

Abstract

A mixed population of about 300 persons that acquired appreciable body burdens of radium 35 to 50 years ago has been followed by our group for the past 20 years. Radium was acquired by these patients by occupational exposure and from administration orally and intravenously by their physicians. To date, a number of these patients have developed fibrosarcomas and osteogenic sarcomas of skeletal tissues, carcinomas and sarcomas of the mastoids and paranasal sinuses, and serious blood dyscrasias. In many cases, analysis of the exposure history and of contemporary, body burdens has enabled us to reconstruct the patterns of radium retention. From these computations, we have been able to analyse the appearance of neoplasms in terms of: (1) contemporary or terminal radium burdens, (2) estimated maximum (i.e. peak initial) radium burdens, and (3) estimated daily and total amounts of radium entering the blood stream during exposure. The ranges of values of these various indices for groups of patients with and without malignant disease and other disabling conditions may serve to characterize the likelihood of radiation carcinogenesis in these and similar patients. (author)
Authors:
Finkel, A. J.; Miller, C. E.; Hasterlik, R. J.; [1]  Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)]
  1. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Nov 15, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-118/7
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on Radiation-Induced Cancer, Athens (Greece), 28 Apr - 2 May 1969; Other Information: 16 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs.; Related Information: In: Radiation-Induced Cancer. Proceedings of a Symposium on Radiation-Induced Cancer| 512 p.
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BODY BURDEN; CALCULATION METHODS; CARCINOGENESIS; CARCINOMAS; FIBROSARCOMAS; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PATIENTS; RADIUM; SINUSES
OSTI ID:
22182154
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M3969006653
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 183-201
Announcement Date:
Jan 23, 2014

Conference:

Citation Formats

Finkel, A. J., Miller, C. E., Hasterlik, R. J., and Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)]. Radiobiological Parameters in Human Cancers Attributable to Long-Term Radium Deposition. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Finkel, A. J., Miller, C. E., Hasterlik, R. J., & Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)]. Radiobiological Parameters in Human Cancers Attributable to Long-Term Radium Deposition. IAEA.
Finkel, A. J., Miller, C. E., Hasterlik, R. J., and Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)]. 1969. "Radiobiological Parameters in Human Cancers Attributable to Long-Term Radium Deposition." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22182154,
title = {Radiobiological Parameters in Human Cancers Attributable to Long-Term Radium Deposition}
author = {Finkel, A. J., Miller, C. E., Hasterlik, R. J., and Argonne Cancer Research Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)]}
abstractNote = {A mixed population of about 300 persons that acquired appreciable body burdens of radium 35 to 50 years ago has been followed by our group for the past 20 years. Radium was acquired by these patients by occupational exposure and from administration orally and intravenously by their physicians. To date, a number of these patients have developed fibrosarcomas and osteogenic sarcomas of skeletal tissues, carcinomas and sarcomas of the mastoids and paranasal sinuses, and serious blood dyscrasias. In many cases, analysis of the exposure history and of contemporary, body burdens has enabled us to reconstruct the patterns of radium retention. From these computations, we have been able to analyse the appearance of neoplasms in terms of: (1) contemporary or terminal radium burdens, (2) estimated maximum (i.e. peak initial) radium burdens, and (3) estimated daily and total amounts of radium entering the blood stream during exposure. The ranges of values of these various indices for groups of patients with and without malignant disease and other disabling conditions may serve to characterize the likelihood of radiation carcinogenesis in these and similar patients. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {Nov}
}