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Food safety and quality through radiation technology: its implications to national security

Thesis/Dissertation:

Abstract

The increasing consumption of ready-to-eat meals necessitates a review of its quality and safety. Food irradiation is a technology that would allow the food product to be free from pathogenic organisms while maintaining its fresh-like taste and appearance. The paper evaluated the effectiveness of food irradiation in maintaining the quality and safety of ready-to-eat meals using the three criteria: microbiological, nutritional and acceptability. Chicken adobo was chosen as a representative ready-to-eat meat. Primary data was collected through experimental and non-experimental methods using irradiated and non-irradiated chicken adobo. Irradiation was carried out at the Multipurpose Irradiation Facility of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute using a radiation dose of 4 kGy at an irradiation temperature of 29.9-32.1 degree centigrade. Experimental data were gathered through laboratory analyses. Nutritional analyses (protein and Vitamin B{sub 1}) as well as microbiological analyses (E. Coli) were conducted at Day 1, Day 7 and Day 15 stored at -4 degree centigrade after irradiation. The non-experimental data were gathered by means of acceptability questionnaires which made use of a modified Likert scale of 1 to 4. This made the respondents rate the food attributes (color, odor, flavor, texture, juiciness) and overall acceptability during the sensory evaluation of both Sample  More>>
Publication Date:
Aug 15, 2012
Product Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Report Number:
INIS-PH-47
Resource Relation:
Other Information: 51refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.; Master in National Security Administration
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; DISINFESTATION; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; FOOD; GAMMA RADIATION; IONIZING RADIATIONS; IRRADIATION; NATIONAL SECURITY; QUALITY ASSURANCE; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIOPRESERVATION; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; WHOLESOMENESS
OSTI ID:
22168254
Research Organizations:
National Defense College of the Philippines, Quezon City (Philippines)
Country of Origin:
Philippines
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: PH1300034122722
Availability:
Available from PNRI library
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
88 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Dec 05, 2013

Thesis/Dissertation:

Citation Formats

Lanuza, Luvimina G. Food safety and quality through radiation technology: its implications to national security. Philippines: N. p., 2012. Web.
Lanuza, Luvimina G. Food safety and quality through radiation technology: its implications to national security. Philippines.
Lanuza, Luvimina G. 2012. "Food safety and quality through radiation technology: its implications to national security." Philippines.
@misc{etde_22168254,
title = {Food safety and quality through radiation technology: its implications to national security}
author = {Lanuza, Luvimina G.}
abstractNote = {The increasing consumption of ready-to-eat meals necessitates a review of its quality and safety. Food irradiation is a technology that would allow the food product to be free from pathogenic organisms while maintaining its fresh-like taste and appearance. The paper evaluated the effectiveness of food irradiation in maintaining the quality and safety of ready-to-eat meals using the three criteria: microbiological, nutritional and acceptability. Chicken adobo was chosen as a representative ready-to-eat meat. Primary data was collected through experimental and non-experimental methods using irradiated and non-irradiated chicken adobo. Irradiation was carried out at the Multipurpose Irradiation Facility of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute using a radiation dose of 4 kGy at an irradiation temperature of 29.9-32.1 degree centigrade. Experimental data were gathered through laboratory analyses. Nutritional analyses (protein and Vitamin B{sub 1}) as well as microbiological analyses (E. Coli) were conducted at Day 1, Day 7 and Day 15 stored at -4 degree centigrade after irradiation. The non-experimental data were gathered by means of acceptability questionnaires which made use of a modified Likert scale of 1 to 4. This made the respondents rate the food attributes (color, odor, flavor, texture, juiciness) and overall acceptability during the sensory evaluation of both Sample A (irradiated) and Sample B (non-irradiated). There were two sets of respondents, the professional and non-professional sector. The laboratory-scale study revealed that the application of gamma irradiation of a dose of 4 kGy at an irradiation temperature range of 29.9 to 32.1 degree centigrade to packed ready-to-eat chicken adobo was found to be an effective treatment for eliminating the E.coli pathogen even up to Day 15 stored at -4 degree centigrade after irradiation. The protein and Vitamin B{sub 1} contents of the food sample were not significantly affected and results of the acceptability tests showed that the dose used did not modify the sensory properties in such a way that they were detected by both sets of respondents. The study recommended that food irradiation technology be adopted by the national government as one of the means to achieve national food security. The results of this study provide science-based evidence in collaborating previous studies on the role of food irradiation technology in ensuring food security such as when used for post-harvest treatment of agricultural crops and for quarantine treatment of fruits and vegetables for export. It must, however, be recognized that the general population may still have fear of radiation. As such, a concerted effort using the quad-media and other government instrumentalities be utilized to effect a paradigm shift of the populace and increase public awareness and acceptance of irradiated food. One can rightly say that food irradiation technology is a tool for national development, and enhances national security through food security. (author)}
place = {Philippines}
year = {2012}
month = {Aug}
}