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Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland

Abstract

The UK Government has identified up to eight locations for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2025. Five of these locations are on the Irish Sea coast. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, RPII was requested by the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government to undertake an assessment of the potential radiological impacts on Ireland from this New Build Programme. This report presents the findings of the potential impacts on Ireland of both the anticipated routine radioactive discharges and of a range of postulated nuclear accident scenarios. The following points are the principal findings of the report. Given the prevailing wind direction in Ireland, radioactive contamination in the air, either from routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants or accidental releases, will most often be transported away from Ireland. The routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants will have no measurable radiological impact on Ireland or the Irish marine environment. The severe accident scenarios assessed ranged in their estimated frequency of occurrance from 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 33 million per year. The assessment used a weather pattern that maximised the transfer of radioactivity to Ireland. For the severe accident scenarios assessed, food  More>>
Publication Date:
May 15, 2013
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INIS-IE-102
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; RADIATION MONITORING; RADIATION PROTECTION; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; REACTOR SAFETY
OSTI ID:
22168120
Research Organizations:
Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (Ireland)
Country of Origin:
Ireland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: IE1300001122588
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available from the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (IE) at http://www.rpii.ie/RPII/files/e8/e8fd1b92-0f67-415a-a37a-d4cb97023eb0.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
256 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Dec 05, 2013

Citation Formats

McMahon, C., Kelleher, K., McGinnity, P., Organo, C., Smith, K., Currivan, L., and Ryan, T. Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland. Ireland: N. p., 2013. Web.
McMahon, C., Kelleher, K., McGinnity, P., Organo, C., Smith, K., Currivan, L., & Ryan, T. Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland. Ireland.
McMahon, C., Kelleher, K., McGinnity, P., Organo, C., Smith, K., Currivan, L., and Ryan, T. 2013. "Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland." Ireland.
@misc{etde_22168120,
title = {Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland}
author = {McMahon, C., Kelleher, K., McGinnity, P., Organo, C., Smith, K., Currivan, L., and Ryan, T.}
abstractNote = {The UK Government has identified up to eight locations for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2025. Five of these locations are on the Irish Sea coast. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, RPII was requested by the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government to undertake an assessment of the potential radiological impacts on Ireland from this New Build Programme. This report presents the findings of the potential impacts on Ireland of both the anticipated routine radioactive discharges and of a range of postulated nuclear accident scenarios. The following points are the principal findings of the report. Given the prevailing wind direction in Ireland, radioactive contamination in the air, either from routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants or accidental releases, will most often be transported away from Ireland. The routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants will have no measurable radiological impact on Ireland or the Irish marine environment. The severe accident scenarios assessed ranged in their estimated frequency of occurrance from 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 33 million per year. The assessment used a weather pattern that maximised the transfer of radioactivity to Ireland. For the severe accident scenarios assessed, food controls or agriculture protective measures would generally be required in Ireland to reduce exposure of the population so as to mitigate potential long-term health effects. In the accident scenario with an estimated 1 in 33 million chance of occurring, short-term measures such as staying indoors would also be advised as a precautionary measure. In general, the accidents with higher potential impact on Ireland are the ones least likely to occur. Regardless of the radiological impact, any accident at the proposed nuclear power plants leading to an increase of radioactivity levels in Ireland would have a socio-economic impact on Ireland. A major accidental release of radioactivity to the Irish Sea would not require any food controls or protective actions in Ireland. There is a continuing need for the maintenance of emergency plans in Ireland to deal with the consequences of a nuclear accident abroad.}
place = {Ireland}
year = {2013}
month = {May}
}