You need JavaScript to view this

Marie Curie and the 'Science of Radioactivity'; Maria Curie y la 'Ciencia de la Radioactividad'

Abstract

This article is about Maria Curie, nee Sklodowska, an outstanding mathematician and physicist who managed to counteract the oppressive rules in her Russian occupied Poland that prevented native Polish from taking advanced studies. She went to Paris to study physics and mathematics at the University at the end of the nineteenth century and, notwithstanding the harsh conditions she had to endure, she obtained honors degrees in both disciplines. After marrying her tutor, Pierre Curie, she and her husband were able to get to the core of the problem of {sup r}adioactivity{sup ,} term that she coined. They discovered two new elements, radium and polonium. Jointly with Becquerel, the Curies were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1903. They kept on with their hard work together until the untimely dead of Pierre in 1906. Taking her husband's chair, she became the first female professor at La Sorbonne. In spite of the hostility toward her for sexist and xenophobic prejudices, she obtained a new Nobel Prize, this time for chemistry, in 1911. Her commitment to help the soldiers in the battlefields over the First World War was extraordinary. She developed portable X-ray machines and even drove herself the trucks that carried  More>>
Authors:
Mercader, Roberto C.; [1]  CONICET Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]
  1. UNLP Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 2009
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-AR-A-21
Resource Relation:
Conference: Seminar on a scientific view of radioactivity from its beginnings to our days, Buenos Aires (Argentina), 5 Dec 2007; Other Information: 6 refs., 7 figs.; Related Information: In: A scientific view of radioactivity from its beginnings to our days| 63 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; FEMALES; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; POLAND; RADIOACTIVITY; RADIUM
OSTI ID:
22150121
Research Organizations:
Instituto de Investigacion y Desarrollo, Academia Nacional de Ciencias de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Country of Origin:
Argentina
Language:
Spanish
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: AR13A0025104792
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form. Also available on line: http://www.ciencias.org.ar/user/FILES/Radioactividad-ANCBA.pdf
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 11-23
Announcement Date:
Nov 14, 2013

Citation Formats

Mercader, Roberto C., and CONICET Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. Marie Curie and the 'Science of Radioactivity'; Maria Curie y la 'Ciencia de la Radioactividad'. Argentina: N. p., 2009. Web.
Mercader, Roberto C., & CONICET Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. Marie Curie and the 'Science of Radioactivity'; Maria Curie y la 'Ciencia de la Radioactividad'. Argentina.
Mercader, Roberto C., and CONICET Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. 2009. "Marie Curie and the 'Science of Radioactivity'; Maria Curie y la 'Ciencia de la Radioactividad'." Argentina.
@misc{etde_22150121,
title = {Marie Curie and the 'Science of Radioactivity'; Maria Curie y la 'Ciencia de la Radioactividad'}
author = {Mercader, Roberto C., and CONICET Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]}
abstractNote = {This article is about Maria Curie, nee Sklodowska, an outstanding mathematician and physicist who managed to counteract the oppressive rules in her Russian occupied Poland that prevented native Polish from taking advanced studies. She went to Paris to study physics and mathematics at the University at the end of the nineteenth century and, notwithstanding the harsh conditions she had to endure, she obtained honors degrees in both disciplines. After marrying her tutor, Pierre Curie, she and her husband were able to get to the core of the problem of {sup r}adioactivity{sup ,} term that she coined. They discovered two new elements, radium and polonium. Jointly with Becquerel, the Curies were awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1903. They kept on with their hard work together until the untimely dead of Pierre in 1906. Taking her husband's chair, she became the first female professor at La Sorbonne. In spite of the hostility toward her for sexist and xenophobic prejudices, she obtained a new Nobel Prize, this time for chemistry, in 1911. Her commitment to help the soldiers in the battlefields over the First World War was extraordinary. She developed portable X-ray machines and even drove herself the trucks that carried them to the field hospitals thus changing forever the way that war-inflicted wounds were treated. She founded the Institut du Radium where her daughter Irene obtained the Nobel Prize for physics in 1935 only months after her mother's dead of leukemia in 1934. (author)}
place = {Argentina}
year = {2009}
month = {Jul}
}