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Long range trajectories

Conference:

Abstract

A single air molecule can have a trajectory that can be described with a line, but most meteorologists use single lines to represent the trajectories of air parcels. A single line trajectory has the disadvantage that it is a categorical description of position. Like categorized forecasts it provides no qualification, and no provision for dispersion in case the parcel contains two or more molecules which may take vastly different paths. Diffusion technology has amply demonstrated that an initial aerosol cloud or volume of gas in the atmosphere not only grows larger, but sometimes divides into puffs, each having a different path or swath. Yet, the average meteorologist, faced with the problem of predicting the future motion of a cloud, usually falls back on the line trajectory approach with the explanation that he had no better tool for long range application. In his more rational moments, he may use some arbitrary device to spread his cloud with distance. One such technique has been to separate the trajectory into two or more trajectories, spaced about the endpoint of the original trajectory after a short period of travel, repeating this every so often like a chain reaction. This has the obvious disadvantage of  More>>
Authors:
Allen, P. W.; Jessup, E. A.; White, R. E. [1] 
  1. Air Resources Field Research Office, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1967
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
AECL-2787
Resource Relation:
Conference: USAEC Meteorological Information Meeting, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada), 11-14 Sep 1967; Other Information: 8 refs., 8 figs.; Related Information: In: Proceedings of the USAEC Meteorological Information Meeting| by Mawson, C.A. (ed.)| 630 p.
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AEROSOLS; AIR; DIFFUSION; METEOROLOGY; TRAJECTORIES
OSTI ID:
22141897
Research Organizations:
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: CA1300234096498
Availability:
Available from INIS in electronic form
Submitting Site:
CANN
Size:
page(s) 176-190
Announcement Date:
Oct 24, 2013

Conference:

Citation Formats

Allen, P. W., Jessup, E. A., and White, R. E. Long range trajectories. Canada: N. p., 1967. Web.
Allen, P. W., Jessup, E. A., & White, R. E. Long range trajectories. Canada.
Allen, P. W., Jessup, E. A., and White, R. E. 1967. "Long range trajectories." Canada.
@misc{etde_22141897,
title = {Long range trajectories}
author = {Allen, P. W., Jessup, E. A., and White, R. E.}
abstractNote = {A single air molecule can have a trajectory that can be described with a line, but most meteorologists use single lines to represent the trajectories of air parcels. A single line trajectory has the disadvantage that it is a categorical description of position. Like categorized forecasts it provides no qualification, and no provision for dispersion in case the parcel contains two or more molecules which may take vastly different paths. Diffusion technology has amply demonstrated that an initial aerosol cloud or volume of gas in the atmosphere not only grows larger, but sometimes divides into puffs, each having a different path or swath. Yet, the average meteorologist, faced with the problem of predicting the future motion of a cloud, usually falls back on the line trajectory approach with the explanation that he had no better tool for long range application. In his more rational moments, he may use some arbitrary device to spread his cloud with distance. One such technique has been to separate the trajectory into two or more trajectories, spaced about the endpoint of the original trajectory after a short period of travel, repeating this every so often like a chain reaction. This has the obvious disadvantage of involving a large amount of labor without much assurance of improved accuracy. Another approach is to draw a circle about the trajectory endpoint, to represent either diffusion or error. The problem then is to know what radius to give the circle and also whether to call it diffusion or error. Meteorologists at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are asked frequently to provide advice which involves trajectory technology, such as prediction of an aerosol cloud path, reconstruction of the motion of a volume of air, indication of the dilution, and the possible trajectory prediction error over great distances. Therefore, we set out, nearly three years ago, to provide some statistical knowledge about the status of our trajectory technology. This report contains some of the results of that study, and in particular, information that may help to evaluate the significance of a trajectory endpoint, whether it is predicted, reconstructed from wind data, or obtained from a single tracer. (author)}
place = {Canada}
year = {1967}
month = {Jul}
}