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Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report

Abstract

Novel manufacturing routes for efficient and low-cost Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (called CIGS) thin film solar cells are explored and patented. CIGS has proven its suitability for highly efficient and extremely stable solar cells. The low-cost methods allow impurity free material synthesis, fast large-area deposition, high material utilization and a very short energy payback time with drastically lower manufacturing costs. Two non-vacuum, solution-based approaches are investigated to deposit thin layers of CIGS. The first approach considers incorporation of copper into indium gallium selenide precursor layers by ion-exchange from aqueous or organic solutions. Organic solutions provide faster copper incorporation and do not corrode the metal back contact. Solar cells processed from selenized precursor films exhibit efficiencies of up to 4.1%. The second approach with paste coating of inorganic salt solution results in a solar cell efficiency of 4% (record 6.7%), where further improvements are hindered by the presence of the residual carbon layer. Using alternative organic binders, pre-deposited selenium layers, non-binder recipes helps to avoid the carbon layer although the obtained layers are inhomogeneous and contain impurity phases. A patent for the ion-exchange approach is pending, and the obtained research results on the paste coating approach will be scrutinized during new European FP7  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 2010
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
SFOE-290269
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; COPPER SELENIDE SOLAR CELLS; INDIUM SELENIDE SOLAR CELLS; GALLIUM SELENIDES; SURFACE COATING; THIN FILMS; DEPOSITION; CHEMICAL PREPARATION; ION EXCHANGE; ORGANIC SOLVENTS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; PATENTS
Sponsoring Organizations:
Swiss Federal Office of Energy, Berne (Switzerland)
OSTI ID:
22131995
Research Organizations:
Laboratory for thin films and photovoltaics, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (Empa), Duebendorf (Switzerland); Thin film physics group, Laboratory for solid state physics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETHZ, Zuerich (Switzerland)
Country of Origin:
Switzerland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: CH12E1080
Availability:
Commercial reproduction prohibited. Available from ETDE as OSTI ID: 22131995;
Submitting Site:
CH
Size:
15 page(s)
Announcement Date:
Sep 21, 2013

Citation Formats

Tiwari, A. N., and Romanyuk, Y. Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report. Switzerland: N. p., 2010. Web.
Tiwari, A. N., & Romanyuk, Y. Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report. Switzerland.
Tiwari, A. N., and Romanyuk, Y. 2010. "Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report." Switzerland.
@misc{etde_22131995,
title = {Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report}
author = {Tiwari, A. N., and Romanyuk, Y.}
abstractNote = {Novel manufacturing routes for efficient and low-cost Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (called CIGS) thin film solar cells are explored and patented. CIGS has proven its suitability for highly efficient and extremely stable solar cells. The low-cost methods allow impurity free material synthesis, fast large-area deposition, high material utilization and a very short energy payback time with drastically lower manufacturing costs. Two non-vacuum, solution-based approaches are investigated to deposit thin layers of CIGS. The first approach considers incorporation of copper into indium gallium selenide precursor layers by ion-exchange from aqueous or organic solutions. Organic solutions provide faster copper incorporation and do not corrode the metal back contact. Solar cells processed from selenized precursor films exhibit efficiencies of up to 4.1%. The second approach with paste coating of inorganic salt solution results in a solar cell efficiency of 4% (record 6.7%), where further improvements are hindered by the presence of the residual carbon layer. Using alternative organic binders, pre-deposited selenium layers, non-binder recipes helps to avoid the carbon layer although the obtained layers are inhomogeneous and contain impurity phases. A patent for the ion-exchange approach is pending, and the obtained research results on the paste coating approach will be scrutinized during new European FP7 project 'NOVA-CIGS'. (authors)}
place = {Switzerland}
year = {2010}
month = {Jan}
}