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Recovery of the Erythropoietin-Sensitive Stem-Cell Population following Total-Body X-Irradiation

Abstract

Erythropoietin acts upon haemopoietic stem cells to initiate their differentiation into the erythroid series. This effect may be used in polycythaemic mice to estimate changes in the erythropoietin-sensitive stem-cell population following total-body irradiation (TBR). Generally, single doses of erythropoietin, less than that needed for maximum stem-cell response, are used to estimate changes in the stem-cell population. The validity of results using this test is based upon accepting several assumptions regarding erythropoietin kinetics. These are: (a) the contribution of endogenous erythropoietin is always negligible; (b) the origin of the dose-response curve to erythropoietin alters only because of changes in stem-cell numbers; (c) the proportion of stem cells responding to a given concentration of erythropoietin is independent of stem-cell numbers; (d) the slope of the dose-response curve does not alter; and (e) competition between erythropoietin and other factors for the stem cells remains unchanged. The studies to be reported indicate that some of these assumptions m a y not always be valid. Following 150 rad TBR, changes in erythropoietin dose-response curves were not always due to changes in the size of the stem-cell population, but also due to changes in erythropoietin kinetics. Changes in erythropoietin kinetics could be corrected for by using  More>>
Authors:
Byron, J. W. [1] 
  1. Paterson Laboratories, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Aug 15, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-103/22
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation, Monaco (Monaco), 1-5 Apr 1968; Other Information: 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.; Related Information: In: Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation| 586 p.
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS AND BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; COMPETITION; DOSES; ERYTHROPOIETIN; KINETICS; MICE; ORIGIN; POPULATIONS; STEM CELLS; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION
OSTI ID:
22121055
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity of the International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M0838077148
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 173-184
Announcement Date:
Aug 16, 2013

Citation Formats

Byron, J. W. Recovery of the Erythropoietin-Sensitive Stem-Cell Population following Total-Body X-Irradiation. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
Byron, J. W. Recovery of the Erythropoietin-Sensitive Stem-Cell Population following Total-Body X-Irradiation. IAEA.
Byron, J. W. 1968. "Recovery of the Erythropoietin-Sensitive Stem-Cell Population following Total-Body X-Irradiation." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22121055,
title = {Recovery of the Erythropoietin-Sensitive Stem-Cell Population following Total-Body X-Irradiation}
author = {Byron, J. W.}
abstractNote = {Erythropoietin acts upon haemopoietic stem cells to initiate their differentiation into the erythroid series. This effect may be used in polycythaemic mice to estimate changes in the erythropoietin-sensitive stem-cell population following total-body irradiation (TBR). Generally, single doses of erythropoietin, less than that needed for maximum stem-cell response, are used to estimate changes in the stem-cell population. The validity of results using this test is based upon accepting several assumptions regarding erythropoietin kinetics. These are: (a) the contribution of endogenous erythropoietin is always negligible; (b) the origin of the dose-response curve to erythropoietin alters only because of changes in stem-cell numbers; (c) the proportion of stem cells responding to a given concentration of erythropoietin is independent of stem-cell numbers; (d) the slope of the dose-response curve does not alter; and (e) competition between erythropoietin and other factors for the stem cells remains unchanged. The studies to be reported indicate that some of these assumptions m a y not always be valid. Following 150 rad TBR, changes in erythropoietin dose-response curves were not always due to changes in the size of the stem-cell population, but also due to changes in erythropoietin kinetics. Changes in erythropoietin kinetics could be corrected for by using doses of erythropoietin which at any particular time after TBR gave maximum stem-cell response; through full dose-response studies, the nature of changes in erythropoietin kinetics following TBR could be established. These studies appear to explain discrepancies in results obtained in different laboratories using the erythropoietin test. The effect of 150 rad TBR on the erythropoietin-sensitive stem-cell population is an initial depression within 30 min to 20% of normal followed by a second depression (post-irradiation dip) at about 12 h. Twenty-four hours after TBR there is a recovery to the initial depression. This level is maintained up to at least 72 h after TBR. By eight days the population recovers to preirradiation levels. This appears to be maintained up to 14 d after TBR without the previously reported overshoot of the erythropoietin-sensitive stem-cell population. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Aug}
}