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Trace Elements in Human Tooth Enamel

Abstract

The trace elements are considered to play a role in the resistance of teeth to dental caries. The exact mechanism by which they act has not yet been fully established. Estimations of trace elements have been undertaken in sound human teeth. By means of activation analysis it has been possible to determine trace element concentrations in different layers of enamel in the same tooth. The concentrations of the following elements have been determined: arsenic, antimony, copper, zinc, manganese, mercury, molybdenum and vanadium. The distribution of trace elements in enamel varies from those with a narrow range, such as manganese, to those with a broad range, such as antimony. The elements present in the broad range are considered to be non-essential and their presence is thought to result from a chance incorporation into the enamel. Those in the narrow range appear to be essential trace elements and are present in amounts which do not vary unduly from other body tissues. Only manganese and zinc were found in higher concentrations in the surface layer of enamel compared with the inner layers. The importance of the concentration of trace elements on this surface layer of enamel is emphasized as this layer is the  More>>
Authors:
Nixon, G. S.; [1]  Smith, H.; Livingston, H. D. [2] 
  1. Turner Dental School, University Of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)
  2. Department of Forensic Medicine, University Of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Oct 15, 1967
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-91/19
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on Nuclear Activation Techniques in the Life Sciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands), 8-12 May 1967; Other Information: 13 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.; Related Information: In: Nuclear Activation Techniques in the Life Sciences. Proceedings of the Symposium on Nuclear Activation Techniques in the Life Sciences| 726 p.
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; ANTIMONY; ARSENIC; CARIES; COPPER; ENAMELS; LAYERS; MANGANESE; MERCURY; MOLYBDENUM; TEETH; VANADIUM; ZINC
OSTI ID:
22116218
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M1277072873
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 455-461
Announcement Date:
Jul 26, 2013

Citation Formats

Nixon, G. S., Smith, H., and Livingston, H. D. Trace Elements in Human Tooth Enamel. IAEA: N. p., 1967. Web.
Nixon, G. S., Smith, H., & Livingston, H. D. Trace Elements in Human Tooth Enamel. IAEA.
Nixon, G. S., Smith, H., and Livingston, H. D. 1967. "Trace Elements in Human Tooth Enamel." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22116218,
title = {Trace Elements in Human Tooth Enamel}
author = {Nixon, G. S., Smith, H., and Livingston, H. D.}
abstractNote = {The trace elements are considered to play a role in the resistance of teeth to dental caries. The exact mechanism by which they act has not yet been fully established. Estimations of trace elements have been undertaken in sound human teeth. By means of activation analysis it has been possible to determine trace element concentrations in different layers of enamel in the same tooth. The concentrations of the following elements have been determined: arsenic, antimony, copper, zinc, manganese, mercury, molybdenum and vanadium. The distribution of trace elements in enamel varies from those with a narrow range, such as manganese, to those with a broad range, such as antimony. The elements present in the broad range are considered to be non-essential and their presence is thought to result from a chance incorporation into the enamel. Those in the narrow range appear to be essential trace elements and are present in amounts which do not vary unduly from other body tissues. Only manganese and zinc were found in higher concentrations in the surface layer of enamel compared with the inner layers. The importance of the concentration of trace elements on this surface layer of enamel is emphasized as this layer is the site of the first attack by the carious process. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1967}
month = {Oct}
}