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Problems in Siting Nuclear Power Plants in Japan and Efforts to Solve Them

Conference:

Abstract

The rapidly growing demand for energy in Japan will require a total capacity of 30 to 40 thousand MW(e) in nuclear power by 1985. Materialization of this development programme must naturally be supported by securing the requisite sites for the nuclear power plants. The following factors make siting of nuclear power plants more difficult in Japan than in any other country: a small, densely populated territory with little level land, that is already completely utilized for agricultural and/or industrial purposes; small rivers and an active marine-product industry developed along most of the seacoasts, both of which create difficult cooling-water problems; frequent earthquakes; and the fear of possible radioactivity, which prevails in the only nation in the world to have suffered from the atomic bomb. There are at present four nuclear power plants in operation or under construction in Japan with a total capacity of about 1.3 thousand MW(e). However, the plants in these construction programmes have been sited on the basis of taking the easiest course available although there were several possible solutions to choose from. It is pointed out here that the long-range nuclear power development programme will call for a fundamental solution to enable siting a large number  More>>
Authors:
Inouye, T. [1] 
  1. Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Tokyo (Japan)
Publication Date:
Sep 15, 1967
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-89/26
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the Containment and Siting of Nuclear Power Plants, Vienna (Austria), 3-7 Apr 1967; Other Information: 1 tab., 4 figs.; Related Information: In: Containment and Siting of Nuclear Power Plants. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Containment and Siting of Nuclear Power Plants| 836 p.
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; APPROXIMATIONS; COOLING; EARTHQUAKES; GEOLOGY; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; JAPAN; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; POPULATION DENSITY; POWER DEMAND; RADIOACTIVITY; SAFEGUARDS; SHORES; SITE SELECTION; TOPOGRAPHY
OSTI ID:
22113781
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M1299070763
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 35-48
Announcement Date:
Jul 22, 2013

Conference:

Citation Formats

Inouye, T. Problems in Siting Nuclear Power Plants in Japan and Efforts to Solve Them. IAEA: N. p., 1967. Web.
Inouye, T. Problems in Siting Nuclear Power Plants in Japan and Efforts to Solve Them. IAEA.
Inouye, T. 1967. "Problems in Siting Nuclear Power Plants in Japan and Efforts to Solve Them." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22113781,
title = {Problems in Siting Nuclear Power Plants in Japan and Efforts to Solve Them}
author = {Inouye, T.}
abstractNote = {The rapidly growing demand for energy in Japan will require a total capacity of 30 to 40 thousand MW(e) in nuclear power by 1985. Materialization of this development programme must naturally be supported by securing the requisite sites for the nuclear power plants. The following factors make siting of nuclear power plants more difficult in Japan than in any other country: a small, densely populated territory with little level land, that is already completely utilized for agricultural and/or industrial purposes; small rivers and an active marine-product industry developed along most of the seacoasts, both of which create difficult cooling-water problems; frequent earthquakes; and the fear of possible radioactivity, which prevails in the only nation in the world to have suffered from the atomic bomb. There are at present four nuclear power plants in operation or under construction in Japan with a total capacity of about 1.3 thousand MW(e). However, the plants in these construction programmes have been sited on the basis of taking the easiest course available although there were several possible solutions to choose from. It is pointed out here that the long-range nuclear power development programme will call for a fundamental solution to enable siting a large number of power plants under the adverse conditions in Japan. Accordingly, a study was made, which included quantitative analyses of reactor siting factors and suggested measures for solving the siting problems. The analyses were based on nuclear power plant sites assumed to be located on the seacoast and characterized by low-population density, desirable geology and favourable topography. It was assumed that seacoast siting was more economical than inland siting. Although the study was made by a general survey using maps, it was shown that approximately 10% of the total coastline areas would be eligible for reactor siting, but most of these areas in this case are located in the northern part of Japan, far from load centres. Unfortunately, less than 1% of the total coastline has areas eligible in the central part of Japan where the electric power demand is large. The results suggest that developments of earthquake engineering, as well as of engineered safeguards, which would enable nuclear power plant construction to cope with the actual situations in Japan, should be carried out as the most important measures for securing sites near the load centres. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1967}
month = {Sep}
}