You need JavaScript to view this

Feed-Back Regulation of Haemopoiesis

Abstract

Studies ate reported on the feed-back regulation of erythropoiesis by means of the intrasplenic cloning system of haemopoietic cells. Polycythaemia, produced by passive transfusion of synzeneic, allogeneic or xenogeneic red blood cells, inhibited the formation of bone-marrow derived erythroid clones. Polycythaemia also inhibited the formation of erythroid clones of endogenous stem cells. Oxygen overloading was found to be a necessary factor in the suppression of erythroid clone formation: no suppression of erythroid colonies was observed when polycythaemic animals were kept under hypoxic conditions. Erythropoietin, either of exogenous or of endogenous origin, elicited a reformation of erythroid clones in 'suppressed' animals. Studies on the kinetics of reformation of erythroid clones after the administration of erythropoietin suggested that the colony-forming stem cell can replicate a few times in the absence of erythropoietin and the cell progeny thus formed are the target cells for erythropoietin action. If, indeed, the colony-forming cell replicates in the absence of the specific inducer, then the cells thus formed should themselves be stem cells. This was substantiated by demonstrating that the cloning efficiency of spleens of polycythaemic recipients was higher than that of non-polycythaemic animals. Experiments indicating that erythroid clones produced by erythropoietin in polycythaemic animals disappeared after  More>>
Authors:
Feldman, M. [1] 
  1. Department of Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovoth (Israel)
Publication Date:
Aug 15, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-103/42
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation, Monaco (Monaco), 1-5 Apr 1968; Other Information: 22 refs.; Related Information: In: Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation| 586 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANIMALS; BLOOD CELLS; BONE MARROW; ERYTHROPOIESIS; ERYTHROPOIETIN; REGULATIONS; STEM CELLS
OSTI ID:
22113770
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity of the International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Contract Number:
Grant C-06165
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M0842070752
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 223-231
Announcement Date:
Jul 20, 2013

Citation Formats

Feldman, M. Feed-Back Regulation of Haemopoiesis. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
Feldman, M. Feed-Back Regulation of Haemopoiesis. IAEA.
Feldman, M. 1968. "Feed-Back Regulation of Haemopoiesis." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22113770,
title = {Feed-Back Regulation of Haemopoiesis}
author = {Feldman, M.}
abstractNote = {Studies ate reported on the feed-back regulation of erythropoiesis by means of the intrasplenic cloning system of haemopoietic cells. Polycythaemia, produced by passive transfusion of synzeneic, allogeneic or xenogeneic red blood cells, inhibited the formation of bone-marrow derived erythroid clones. Polycythaemia also inhibited the formation of erythroid clones of endogenous stem cells. Oxygen overloading was found to be a necessary factor in the suppression of erythroid clone formation: no suppression of erythroid colonies was observed when polycythaemic animals were kept under hypoxic conditions. Erythropoietin, either of exogenous or of endogenous origin, elicited a reformation of erythroid clones in 'suppressed' animals. Studies on the kinetics of reformation of erythroid clones after the administration of erythropoietin suggested that the colony-forming stem cell can replicate a few times in the absence of erythropoietin and the cell progeny thus formed are the target cells for erythropoietin action. If, indeed, the colony-forming cell replicates in the absence of the specific inducer, then the cells thus formed should themselves be stem cells. This was substantiated by demonstrating that the cloning efficiency of spleens of polycythaemic recipients was higher than that of non-polycythaemic animals. Experiments indicating that erythroid clones produced by erythropoietin in polycythaemic animals disappeared after the discontinuance of erythropoietin application demonstrated the distinction between the 'mitogenic' and the 'morphogenetic' effects of erythropoietin. The latter seemed to be operated by an early transcription of RNA for proteins necessary for the complete maturation of the red blood cell, Erythroid clones produced by foetal haemopoietic stem cells seemed to be regulated by a different mechanism from that which controls the formation of bone-marrow derived clones. Clones produced by foetal cells were only partially suppressed in the polycythaemic recipients. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Aug}
}