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Modern Breeding Methods for Improving Protein Quality and Quantity in Plants

Abstract

Against the background of the world's urgent need for increased protein production and for an improved quality of vegetable proteins, the ability of plant breeding to contribute to this need is discussed. With examples especially from maize and wheat, existing variations in protein content and protein composition are surveyed, together with the interdependence of these characteristics and their co-variation with the yield. It is shown that plant breeding has a great potential for improving the world's food situation. It is also shown that more rapid achievements are possible than is generally considered to be characteristic of plant-breeding techniques. Special emphasis is stressed on: (a) The capacity of mutation breeding, alone and in conjunction with other methods, to contribute to an increased production of high quality protein; (b) The necessity for the success of programmes whereby fast, cheap, and if possible non-destructive analytical procedures are developed to determine protein and amino acids; (c) The importance of the close collaboration of plant breeders with specialists in related subjects such as soil fertilization, physiology and nutrition, food technology, and biochemistry; (d) The importance of international co-operation and co-ordination. (author)
Authors:
Dumanovic, J.; Ehrenberg, L. [1] 
  1. Institute for the Application of Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, Veterinary Medicine and Forestry, Belgrade, Yugoslavia (Serbia)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-97/39
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the use of isotope in studies of nitrogen metabolism in the soils-plant-animal system, Vienna (Austria), 28 Aug - 1 Sep 1967; Other Information: 45 refs.; Related Information: In: Isotope Studies on the Nitrogen Chain. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Use of Isotopes in Studies of Nitrogen Metabolism in the Soil-Plant-Animal System| 360 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; AMINO ACIDS; BREEDING; FERTILIZATION; MAIZE; MUTATIONS; NUTRITION; PLANT BREEDING; PROTEINS; VEGETABLES; WHEAT
OSTI ID:
22108096
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome (Italy); Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity of the International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M1081065907
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 325-336
Announcement Date:
Jun 27, 2013

Citation Formats

Dumanovic, J., and Ehrenberg, L. Modern Breeding Methods for Improving Protein Quality and Quantity in Plants. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
Dumanovic, J., & Ehrenberg, L. Modern Breeding Methods for Improving Protein Quality and Quantity in Plants. IAEA.
Dumanovic, J., and Ehrenberg, L. 1968. "Modern Breeding Methods for Improving Protein Quality and Quantity in Plants." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22108096,
title = {Modern Breeding Methods for Improving Protein Quality and Quantity in Plants}
author = {Dumanovic, J., and Ehrenberg, L.}
abstractNote = {Against the background of the world's urgent need for increased protein production and for an improved quality of vegetable proteins, the ability of plant breeding to contribute to this need is discussed. With examples especially from maize and wheat, existing variations in protein content and protein composition are surveyed, together with the interdependence of these characteristics and their co-variation with the yield. It is shown that plant breeding has a great potential for improving the world's food situation. It is also shown that more rapid achievements are possible than is generally considered to be characteristic of plant-breeding techniques. Special emphasis is stressed on: (a) The capacity of mutation breeding, alone and in conjunction with other methods, to contribute to an increased production of high quality protein; (b) The necessity for the success of programmes whereby fast, cheap, and if possible non-destructive analytical procedures are developed to determine protein and amino acids; (c) The importance of the close collaboration of plant breeders with specialists in related subjects such as soil fertilization, physiology and nutrition, food technology, and biochemistry; (d) The importance of international co-operation and co-ordination. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Jul}
}