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The Role of Amino Acids in Gluconeogenesis in Lactating Ruminants

Abstract

Gluconeogenesis has an important metabolic role in all animals, but it is especially important in ruminants because of the paucity of their alimentary glucose. Several amino acids give rise to glucogenic precursors during metabolism and thus dietary or body protein represents an important source of potential glucogenic material that the ruminant can utilize to manufacture the glucose required for its physiological functions. The role of various amino acids as glucose precursors has been evaluated in lactating ruminants by making a single intravenous injection of several different amino acids uniformly labelled with {sup 14}C and following, with time, the rate and extent of incorporation of {sup 14}C into the plasma glucose. The time interval after injecting each {sup 14}C-amino acid until the specific activity maximum occurred in plasma glucose was found to vary widely among the different amino acids. Thus, the maximum specific activity in plasma glucose occurred 6 min after injection of L-aspartate-{sup 14}C and 15 min after injection of L-glutamate- {sup 14}C, while for L-valine-{sup 14}C and L-arginine-{sup 14}C the maximum specific activity in plasma glucose did not occur until 45 and 90 min, respectively, had elapsed. After injection of L-serine and L-alanine there were several maxima in the  More>>
Authors:
Black, A. L.; Egan, A. R.; Anand, R. S.; Chapman, T. E. [1] 
  1. Department of Physiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-97/30
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the use of isotope in studies of nitrogen metabolism in the soils-plant-animal system, Vienna (Austria), 28 Aug - 1 Sep 1967; Other Information: 34 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.; Related Information: In: Isotope Studies on the Nitrogen Chain. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Use of Isotopes in Studies of Nitrogen Metabolism in the Soil-Plant-Animal System| 360 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ALANINES; ARGININE; CARBON; CARBON 14; COWS; GLUCOSE; GOATS; INTRAVENOUS INJECTION; LACTATES; METABOLISM; PLASMA; PRECURSOR; PROTEINS; SERINE; SYNTHESIS; VALINE
OSTI ID:
22108091
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome (Italy); Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity of the International Council of Scientific Unions, Paris (France)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Contract Number:
Grant HD-02375; G-633-PATC-3
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M1075065902
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 247-261
Announcement Date:
Jun 27, 2013

Citation Formats

Black, A. L., Egan, A. R., Anand, R. S., and Chapman, T. E. The Role of Amino Acids in Gluconeogenesis in Lactating Ruminants. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
Black, A. L., Egan, A. R., Anand, R. S., & Chapman, T. E. The Role of Amino Acids in Gluconeogenesis in Lactating Ruminants. IAEA.
Black, A. L., Egan, A. R., Anand, R. S., and Chapman, T. E. 1968. "The Role of Amino Acids in Gluconeogenesis in Lactating Ruminants." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22108091,
title = {The Role of Amino Acids in Gluconeogenesis in Lactating Ruminants}
author = {Black, A. L., Egan, A. R., Anand, R. S., and Chapman, T. E.}
abstractNote = {Gluconeogenesis has an important metabolic role in all animals, but it is especially important in ruminants because of the paucity of their alimentary glucose. Several amino acids give rise to glucogenic precursors during metabolism and thus dietary or body protein represents an important source of potential glucogenic material that the ruminant can utilize to manufacture the glucose required for its physiological functions. The role of various amino acids as glucose precursors has been evaluated in lactating ruminants by making a single intravenous injection of several different amino acids uniformly labelled with {sup 14}C and following, with time, the rate and extent of incorporation of {sup 14}C into the plasma glucose. The time interval after injecting each {sup 14}C-amino acid until the specific activity maximum occurred in plasma glucose was found to vary widely among the different amino acids. Thus, the maximum specific activity in plasma glucose occurred 6 min after injection of L-aspartate-{sup 14}C and 15 min after injection of L-glutamate- {sup 14}C, while for L-valine-{sup 14}C and L-arginine-{sup 14}C the maximum specific activity in plasma glucose did not occur until 45 and 90 min, respectively, had elapsed. After injection of L-serine and L-alanine there were several maxima in the glucose specific activity. These maxima occurred between 12 and 24 min after injection of serine and during the first 30 min after injection of alanine indicating that carbon from these amino acids becomes available for glucose synthesis along diverse pathways which have different delays. Although only a few amino acids have been studied, the experimental results obtained clearly suggest an important metabolic role for protein in ruminants which has previously not been recognized. It appears that amino acids, released from protein, are utilized by the animal in a fashion which results in a prolonged availability of glucogenic precursors so that the animal can form glucose over long intervals of time. This characteristic of slowly providing potential glucogenic material should ensure more efficient utilization of the carbon for glucose synthesis. Data will be presented indicating the relative quantitative importance of the different amino acids as glucose precursors in lactating goats and cows. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Jul}
}