You need JavaScript to view this

Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning

Abstract

Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, {sup 131}I human serum albumin (25 {mu}Ci/10 lb), {sup 99m}Tc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), {sup 131}I iodipamide (40 {mu}Ci/10 lb), and {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of {sup 99m}Tc  More>>
Authors:
Maxfield, W. S.; [1]  Weiss, T. E.; Tutton, R. H.; Hidalgo, J. U. [2] 
  1. Dept, of Radiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)
  2. Ochsner Clinic and Ochsner Foundation Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States)
Publication Date:
May 15, 1969
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-108/86
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scintigraphy, Salzburg (Austria), 6-15 Aug 1968; Other Information: 12 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.; Related Information: In: Medical Radioisotope Scintigraphy. Proceedings of a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scintigraphy. V. II| 952 p.
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ACCURACY; ALBUMINS; BLOOD SERUM; HALF-LIFE; INDIUM 130; IODINE 131; JOINTS; RHEUMATIC DISEASES; SCINTISCANNING; TECHNETIUM 99
OSTI ID:
22108009
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M0490065820
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 307-320
Announcement Date:
Jun 27, 2013

Citation Formats

Maxfield, W. S., Weiss, T. E., Tutton, R. H., and Hidalgo, J. U. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning. IAEA: N. p., 1969. Web.
Maxfield, W. S., Weiss, T. E., Tutton, R. H., & Hidalgo, J. U. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning. IAEA.
Maxfield, W. S., Weiss, T. E., Tutton, R. H., and Hidalgo, J. U. 1969. "Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22108009,
title = {Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning}
author = {Maxfield, W. S., Weiss, T. E., Tutton, R. H., and Hidalgo, J. U.}
abstractNote = {Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, {sup 131}I human serum albumin (25 {mu}Ci/10 lb), {sup 99m}Tc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), {sup 131}I iodipamide (40 {mu}Ci/10 lb), and {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate and an Anger camera have made joint scanning a practical technique for clinical use. A review of the accuracy of joint scanning in 130 cases as compared to roentgenograms is presented. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1969}
month = {May}
}