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Genetic and Cytogenetic Basis of Radiation-Induced Sterility in the Adult Male Cabbage Looper Trichoplusia Ni

Conference:

Abstract

The relationship of egg hatch as a function of radiation dose is of a two-hit nature when irradiated adult males are mated to non-irradiated virgin females. Sterility as a function of dose is usually linear in insects. However, other species of moths respond similarly to irradiation, so it is indicative that the mechanism involved in producing sterility in Lepidoptera is basically different from that in other insects. The significance of the two-hit kinetics is discussed in relation to the chromosome structure and possible mechanisms for the induction of sterility in Lepidoptera. Many workers using Lepidoptera have reported that females mated to irradiated males oviposit substantially fewer eggs than normally. This response has been correlated to a lack of sperm transfer by irradiated males, even though they pass a spermatophore. The phenomenon is dose-dependent. Although Lepidoptera are far more radioresistant than other insect species when measured by the induction of sterility in the male, there appears to be very little difference when longevity is used as the criterion. The radiation dose required to reduce the lifespan of a newly emerged cabbage looper male by 50% was found to be approximately the same as that for the house fly. High doses of  More>>
Authors:
North, D. T.; Holt, G. G. [1] 
  1. Metabolism and Radiation Research Laboratory, Entomology Research Division, ARS, United States Department of Agriculture, Fargo, ND (United States)
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-102/39
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology, Vienna (Austria), 4-8 Dec 1967; Other Information: 21 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.; Related Information: In: Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology| 445 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADULTS; BRASSICA; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; CHROMOSOMES; FEMALES; GAMMA RADIATION; MALES; MATING; MOTHS; MUTANTS; PROGENY; RADIATION DOSES; SPERMATOZOA; STERILITY
OSTI ID:
22106400
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome (Italy)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M0933064221
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 391-402
Announcement Date:
Jun 20, 2013

Conference:

Citation Formats

North, D. T., and Holt, G. G. Genetic and Cytogenetic Basis of Radiation-Induced Sterility in the Adult Male Cabbage Looper Trichoplusia Ni. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
North, D. T., & Holt, G. G. Genetic and Cytogenetic Basis of Radiation-Induced Sterility in the Adult Male Cabbage Looper Trichoplusia Ni. IAEA.
North, D. T., and Holt, G. G. 1968. "Genetic and Cytogenetic Basis of Radiation-Induced Sterility in the Adult Male Cabbage Looper Trichoplusia Ni." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22106400,
title = {Genetic and Cytogenetic Basis of Radiation-Induced Sterility in the Adult Male Cabbage Looper Trichoplusia Ni}
author = {North, D. T., and Holt, G. G.}
abstractNote = {The relationship of egg hatch as a function of radiation dose is of a two-hit nature when irradiated adult males are mated to non-irradiated virgin females. Sterility as a function of dose is usually linear in insects. However, other species of moths respond similarly to irradiation, so it is indicative that the mechanism involved in producing sterility in Lepidoptera is basically different from that in other insects. The significance of the two-hit kinetics is discussed in relation to the chromosome structure and possible mechanisms for the induction of sterility in Lepidoptera. Many workers using Lepidoptera have reported that females mated to irradiated males oviposit substantially fewer eggs than normally. This response has been correlated to a lack of sperm transfer by irradiated males, even though they pass a spermatophore. The phenomenon is dose-dependent. Although Lepidoptera are far more radioresistant than other insect species when measured by the induction of sterility in the male, there appears to be very little difference when longevity is used as the criterion. The radiation dose required to reduce the lifespan of a newly emerged cabbage looper male by 50% was found to be approximately the same as that for the house fly. High doses of radiation have no immediate effect on the mating behaviour of the irradiated male. With a recessive eye-colour mutant as a sperm marker, it was determined in tests utilizing double matings that the second mating is the effective mating. Sperm mixing is not prevalent; rather it appears to be a 'sperm flushing' phenomenon in that sperm from the first mating are displaced by sperm from the second mating. Radiation studies with the cabbage looper have demonstrated that the progeny of a cross where the male parent receives a sub-sterilizing dose of gamma radiation are often semi-sterile when mated to non-irradiated individuals. The amount of inherited sterility is directly dependent on the amount of radiation given the original parent. A dose of 10 krad to a P{sub 1} male, for example, only induces 15 to 20% sterility. However, of the surviving progeny as many as 50% will be semi-sterile with 20% being completely sterile when mated to non-irradiated individuals. The cytogenetic implications of this are discussed; namely, the effect of diffuse centromeres, and the induction of reciprocal translocations. Data are presented on induced translocation frequencies by various doses of radiation and the F{sub 2} - bred behaviour of these individuals. This approach possibly affords a more effective tool in insect control. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Jun}
}