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Theoretical and Practical Studies on a Possible Genetic Method for Tsetse Fly Control

Abstract

Chromosome translocations may be useful in pest control because they are a common type of mutation in a variety of organisms and, frequently, the heterozygote is semi-sterile and the homo- zygote folly fertile. It might be possible to induce such a translocation in a pest species, to breed from a selected ancestral pair of translocation homozygotes a large number of the homozygotes and to release these into a wild population. This would cause the production of heterozygotes in the wild population and hence would reduce the fertility of the population. This reduction would persist for a number of generations. Calculations, based on simplified assumptions, showed that this method of fertility reduction might be more economical than the use of sterilized males. In the present paper a theoretical comparison is made of the translocation and sterilized-male methods for the control of tsetse flies (Glossina sp.). A computer model has been set up which simulates, as far as possible, the known facts about birth, mating and death in a wild tsetse population. The predicted effects of releases of sterilized males and of translocation homozygotes are described and the modifications which would be caused by density-dependent mortality, migration and reduced viability of the  More>>
Authors:
Curtis, C. F.; [1]  Hill, W. G. [2] 
  1. Tsetse Research Laboratory, School of Veterinary Science, University Of Bristol, Langford, Bristol (United Kingdom)
  2. Institute of Animal Genetics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-102/26
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology, Vienna (Austria), 4-8 Dec 1967; Other Information: 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.; Related Information: In: Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology| 445 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; CHROMOSOMES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EFFICIENCY; FERTILITY; GAMMA RADIATION; GENOTYPE; GLOSSINA; HYBRIDIZATION; MALES; MORTALITY; MUTATIONS; PEST CONTROL; POPULATIONS; PROGENY; STERILITY; TRANSLOCATION; ZYGOTES
OSTI ID:
22106388
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome (Italy)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M0921064209
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 233-245
Announcement Date:
Jun 20, 2013

Citation Formats

Curtis, C. F., and Hill, W. G. Theoretical and Practical Studies on a Possible Genetic Method for Tsetse Fly Control. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
Curtis, C. F., & Hill, W. G. Theoretical and Practical Studies on a Possible Genetic Method for Tsetse Fly Control. IAEA.
Curtis, C. F., and Hill, W. G. 1968. "Theoretical and Practical Studies on a Possible Genetic Method for Tsetse Fly Control." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22106388,
title = {Theoretical and Practical Studies on a Possible Genetic Method for Tsetse Fly Control}
author = {Curtis, C. F., and Hill, W. G.}
abstractNote = {Chromosome translocations may be useful in pest control because they are a common type of mutation in a variety of organisms and, frequently, the heterozygote is semi-sterile and the homo- zygote folly fertile. It might be possible to induce such a translocation in a pest species, to breed from a selected ancestral pair of translocation homozygotes a large number of the homozygotes and to release these into a wild population. This would cause the production of heterozygotes in the wild population and hence would reduce the fertility of the population. This reduction would persist for a number of generations. Calculations, based on simplified assumptions, showed that this method of fertility reduction might be more economical than the use of sterilized males. In the present paper a theoretical comparison is made of the translocation and sterilized-male methods for the control of tsetse flies (Glossina sp.). A computer model has been set up which simulates, as far as possible, the known facts about birth, mating and death in a wild tsetse population. The predicted effects of releases of sterilized males and of translocation homozygotes are described and the modifications which would be caused by density-dependent mortality, migration and reduced viability of the translocation genotypes and sterilized males are indicated. It is concluded that to eradicate a well isolated wild population the numbers of translocation homozygotes required might well be considerably less than the number of sterilized males required for the same task. However, immigration into the population would greatly reduce the efficiency of the translocation method. The progress so far in attempting to produce a suitable translocation in Glossina austeni is described. Males have been treated with 5-7 krad of gamma radiation and a number of semi-sterile individuals have been selected from among their progeny. The semi-sterility is inherited and, by analogy with the results in other organisms, is presumed to be due to translocation heterozygosity. The methods being used to attempt to derive translocation homozygotes from the semi-sterile lines are described. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Jun}
}