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Correlations, Interactions and Differences between Radiation Effects on Longevity and Natural Aging

Conference:

Abstract

The non-genetic overall radiation response of insects is expressed by the fitness components 'developmental rate' and 'adult lifespan', and is hence related to natural aging. Based on Drosophila, with additional remarks on other insects, the paper demonstrates that, in the developmental stages, ionizing radiation affects the differentiation processes. Distinct sensitive phases are apparent for the induction of different injuries, as are effective phases during wnich the damage exhibits its lethal action. With increasing differentiation, the radiation sensitivity decreases. The primary biological damage is, at least in part, some kind of somatic mutation. A review of adult irradiation response is also based on Drosophila. At least two different types of induced mortality are evident. Type 1 occurs early after irradiation with high doses. It is probably due to central nervous injury and is a common effect in insects, as is indicated by a comparison of various species. Type 2 is a more delayed death at median and low doses. It is of different appearance in various insects, and this heterogeneity is even seen within one species. Thus, sterilizing Drosophila females may result in a considerable prolongation or in a drastic reduction of lifespan. Experimental evidence is found in Drosophila against the  More>>
Authors:
Noethel, H. [1] 
  1. Institute of Genetics, Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1968
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
IAEA-SM-102/10
Resource Relation:
Conference: Symposium on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology, Vienna (Austria), 4-8 Dec 1967; Other Information: 48 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.; Related Information: In: Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Use of Isotopes and Radiation in Entomology| 445 p.
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ADULTS; AGING; DOSES; DROSOPHILA; FEMALES; GENOTYPE; INJURIES; INTERACTIONS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; IRRADIATION; MORTALITY; RADIATION EFFECTS; SENSITIVITY; SOMATIC MUTATIONS
OSTI ID:
22106375
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome (Italy)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13M0908064196
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 87-102
Announcement Date:
Jun 20, 2013

Conference:

Citation Formats

Noethel, H. Correlations, Interactions and Differences between Radiation Effects on Longevity and Natural Aging. IAEA: N. p., 1968. Web.
Noethel, H. Correlations, Interactions and Differences between Radiation Effects on Longevity and Natural Aging. IAEA.
Noethel, H. 1968. "Correlations, Interactions and Differences between Radiation Effects on Longevity and Natural Aging." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22106375,
title = {Correlations, Interactions and Differences between Radiation Effects on Longevity and Natural Aging}
author = {Noethel, H.}
abstractNote = {The non-genetic overall radiation response of insects is expressed by the fitness components 'developmental rate' and 'adult lifespan', and is hence related to natural aging. Based on Drosophila, with additional remarks on other insects, the paper demonstrates that, in the developmental stages, ionizing radiation affects the differentiation processes. Distinct sensitive phases are apparent for the induction of different injuries, as are effective phases during wnich the damage exhibits its lethal action. With increasing differentiation, the radiation sensitivity decreases. The primary biological damage is, at least in part, some kind of somatic mutation. A review of adult irradiation response is also based on Drosophila. At least two different types of induced mortality are evident. Type 1 occurs early after irradiation with high doses. It is probably due to central nervous injury and is a common effect in insects, as is indicated by a comparison of various species. Type 2 is a more delayed death at median and low doses. It is of different appearance in various insects, and this heterogeneity is even seen within one species. Thus, sterilizing Drosophila females may result in a considerable prolongation or in a drastic reduction of lifespan. Experimental evidence is found in Drosophila against the 'induced aging' hypothesis of radiation death. Type 1 mortality increases with increasing age at exposure. The amount of the increase in sensitivity depends indirectly on biological age. Both of these parameters are fixed by genotype, as is the mode of interaction between them. Type 2 mortality follows an initial latent period within an 'induced mortality' period. The latter lasts always the same time, independently of age at irradiation. The latent period, however, is shortened in general with increasing age at exposure. This effect seems to depend on metabolic properties rather than on aging itself, as is indicated especially by a prolongation in early adult life. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1968}
month = {Jun}
}