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Direct Reactions

Conference:

Abstract

In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions  More>>
Authors:
Austern, N. [1] 
  1. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jan 15, 1963
Product Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Summer School on Selected Topics in Nuclear Theory, Low Tatra Mountains (Czech Republic), 20 Aug - 9 Sep 1962; Other Information: 24 figs., 40 refs.; Related Information: In: Selected Topics in Nuclear Theory. Lectures Given at the International Summer School on Selected Topics in Nuclear Theory| by Janouch, F. (ed.)| 470 p.
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; COMPOUND NUCLEI; CROSS SECTIONS; DEGREES OF FREEDOM; DIRECT REACTIONS; ELASTIC SCATTERING; EXCITATION; FINAL-STATE INTERACTIONS; LECTURES; NUCLEI; WAVE FUNCTIONS
OSTI ID:
22095801
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nuclear Research Institute of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic)
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISSN 0074-1884; TRN: XA13R0233053942
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
page(s) 17-83
Announcement Date:
May 16, 2013

Conference:

Citation Formats

Austern, N. Direct Reactions. IAEA: N. p., 1963. Web.
Austern, N. Direct Reactions. IAEA.
Austern, N. 1963. "Direct Reactions." IAEA.
@misc{etde_22095801,
title = {Direct Reactions}
author = {Austern, N.}
abstractNote = {In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1963}
month = {Jan}
}